Experimental Investigation of the Interlaminar Failure of Glass/Elium® Thermoplastic Composites Manufactured With Different Processing Temperatures

Ning Han, Onur Yuksel, Jamal Seyyed Monfared Zanjani, Lu Ling An*, Remko Akkerman, Ismet Baran*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of the processing temperature on the interfacial failure of glass/Elium® 150 composites. The vacuum assisted resin transfer molding technique (VARTM) was used to manufacture glass/Elium® 150 composites at three different process temperatures: room temperature (24℃), 50℃ and 80℃. The interlaminar shear strength, mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness of the laminates were determined by performing the short beam shear (SBS), double cantilever beam (DCB) and end notched flexure (ENF) tests, respectively. It was found that the increase in processing temperature improved the interlaminar shear strength, mode I and mode II interlaminar fracture toughness by approximately 41%, 66% and 227%, respectively. A combined compressive and shear failure mode was found in SBS tests. Fiber bridging was present for all the composite specimens in DCB tests according to the travelling recording camera images. Fracture surface images obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after the ENF tests revealed that a better fiber-matrix bonding and a ductile matrix failure were obtained for higher processing temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
JournalApplied composite materials
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print/First online - 3 Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Fracture toughness
  • Glass/Elium
  • Interlaminar fracture
  • Scanning electron microscopy (SEM)
  • Thermoplastic composites (TPCs)
  • Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM)
  • UT-Hybrid-D

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