Experimental study of a pulse tube cold head driven by a low frequency thermal compressor

Y. Zhao, W. Dai, Srinivas Vanapalli, X. Wang, Y. Chen, E. Luo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
233 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperature span a number of application domains, such as cooling of superconducting magnets, SQUID devices etc. GM type cryocoolers are widely used at liquid helium temperature but with shortcomings of using an oil-lubricated compressor that require regular maintenance and rotary valves that reduces the efficiency of the cryocooler. We are developing an alternative system that makes use of a Vuilleumier type thermal compressor. The system consists of a Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler that provides a cold heat sink to a thermal compressor. The thermal compressor generates pressure wave to drive a second pulse tube cold head. We experimentally studied the influence of pre-cooling temperature and frequency on the performance of the pulse tube cold head. The lowest recorded temperature is 24.3 K with a pressure ratio of 1.18 and a frequency of 3 Hz. In this paper, the design of the cooling system and preliminary experimental results are presented
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRefrigeration Science and Technology
Place of PublicationBucharest
Pages32-39
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2016
Event1st International Conference IIR of Cryogenics and Refrigeration Technology, ICCRT 2016: Cryogenics and Refrigeration Technology - The Hotel Capitol, Bucharest, Romania
Duration: 22 Jun 201625 Jun 2016
Conference number: 1
http://iccrt2016.criofrig.ro/

Conference

Conference1st International Conference IIR of Cryogenics and Refrigeration Technology, ICCRT 2016
Abbreviated titleICCRT
CountryRomania
CityBucharest
Period22/06/1625/06/16
Internet address

Keywords

  • IR-101041
  • METIS-317638

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