Experimental Techniques for Retrieving Flow Information from within Inkjet Nozzles

Mark-Jan van der Meulen, H. Reinten, Johan Frederik Dijksman, Detlef Lohse, Michel Versluis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printing microdroplets are ejected from the nozzle as a result of the internal acoustics set in motion by a pressure pulse from an expanding bubble or a piezoelement. The acoustic response, both in the frequency domain and in the time domain, and the resulting droplet formation processes are well-modeled and characterized by various experimental techniques. However, the behavior of the liquid meniscus in the nozzle is a critical mediator between these regimes and poorly accessible in experiment. The meniscus shape and motion vary between different print head designs, electrical pulse shapes and wetting conditions. In the last decade several novel approaches have been proposed and implemented to study experimentally the meniscus motion within inkjet nozzles. These experimental methods are reviewed here and compared in terms of accuracy and applicability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40502-1-40502-14
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of imaging science and technology
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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information flow
menisci
nozzles
Nozzles
Acoustics
pressure pulses
acoustics
printing
wetting
Wetting
Printing
bubbles
Liquids
liquids
pulses
Experiments

Keywords

  • METIS-320683
  • IR-103899

Cite this

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title = "Experimental Techniques for Retrieving Flow Information from within Inkjet Nozzles",
abstract = "In drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printing microdroplets are ejected from the nozzle as a result of the internal acoustics set in motion by a pressure pulse from an expanding bubble or a piezoelement. The acoustic response, both in the frequency domain and in the time domain, and the resulting droplet formation processes are well-modeled and characterized by various experimental techniques. However, the behavior of the liquid meniscus in the nozzle is a critical mediator between these regimes and poorly accessible in experiment. The meniscus shape and motion vary between different print head designs, electrical pulse shapes and wetting conditions. In the last decade several novel approaches have been proposed and implemented to study experimentally the meniscus motion within inkjet nozzles. These experimental methods are reviewed here and compared in terms of accuracy and applicability.",
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Experimental Techniques for Retrieving Flow Information from within Inkjet Nozzles. / van der Meulen, Mark-Jan; Reinten, H.; Dijksman, Johan Frederik; Lohse, Detlef; Versluis, Michel.

In: Journal of imaging science and technology, Vol. 60, No. 4, 2016, p. 40502-1-40502-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experimental Techniques for Retrieving Flow Information from within Inkjet Nozzles

AU - van der Meulen, Mark-Jan

AU - Reinten, H.

AU - Dijksman, Johan Frederik

AU - Lohse, Detlef

AU - Versluis, Michel

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

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AB - In drop-on-demand (DOD) inkjet printing microdroplets are ejected from the nozzle as a result of the internal acoustics set in motion by a pressure pulse from an expanding bubble or a piezoelement. The acoustic response, both in the frequency domain and in the time domain, and the resulting droplet formation processes are well-modeled and characterized by various experimental techniques. However, the behavior of the liquid meniscus in the nozzle is a critical mediator between these regimes and poorly accessible in experiment. The meniscus shape and motion vary between different print head designs, electrical pulse shapes and wetting conditions. In the last decade several novel approaches have been proposed and implemented to study experimentally the meniscus motion within inkjet nozzles. These experimental methods are reviewed here and compared in terms of accuracy and applicability.

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KW - IR-103899

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