Exploring shifts in the characteristics of US government-funded science curriculum materials and their (unintended) consequences

Natalie Pareja Roblin, Christian Schunn, Debra Bernstein, Susan McKenney* (Corresponding Author)

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
72 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Grant-funded curriculum development efforts can substantially impact practice and research in science education. Therefore, understanding the sometimes-unintended consequences of changes in grant priorities is crucial. Using the case of two large funding agencies in the United States, the current portfolio review provides insight into these consequences by examining shifts in the characteristics of K-12 science curriculum materials funded during two time periods with differing funding priorities. Findings revealed a move away from comprehensive curricula, increased reliance on technology-based materials, a growing trend towards open access, but also a decrease in teacher supports. While these shifts may enhance teachers’ flexibility to shape curriculum, they also increase the challenge of ensuring curricular coherence. Recommendations are outlined for policymakers, science education researchers, and curriculum developers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-39
Number of pages39
JournalStudies in Science Education
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D
  • logistic regression
  • portfolio review
  • Science education
  • curriculum materials

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