Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition

H. Acar, Hakki Acar

Abstract

The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. These properties enable us to produce complex, three-dimensional materials even on non-flat substrates in a rapid fashion. However, to fabricate plasmonic materials with EBID one needs to overcome some difficulties and limitations. The major challenge to solve is the impurity issue of the deposited metallic structures. We circumvent the impurity problem by deposition of silica instead of a metal. Metallic nanostructures are obtained by subsequent conformal thin gold film coating. At the end of the coating process we obtain a core-shell type plasmonic structures. Additionally with the local deposition feature of EBID we load the gap of plasmonic split-wire gold nanoantennas. The loading is established with silica deposition. The gap field of the nanoantennas are loaded with various amount of silica. The optical properties of the loaded antennas are investigated with CL spectroscopy. The results reveal that the gap loading shifts the antenna resonance towards longer wavelengths as a function of the amount of deposited silica. Light-matter interaction related studies beyond the classical limits of the optics (nanophotonics) is a broad field. Both fundamental and applied nanophotonics investigations require state-of-the-art nanostructures with various geometries and material properties to push the boundaries. The work in this thesis demonstrates that EBID is an attractive nanofabrication technique to produce nanostructures that are three-dimensional, tunable (active or passive), with different materials, on different types of surface.
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • University of Twente
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Supervisor
  • Brugger, J., Member
  • Elwenspoek, Michael Curt, Member
  • Herek, Jennifer Lynn, Member
  • Kruit, P., Member
  • Member
  • Vos, Willem L., Member
  • Kuipers, L., Supervisor
  • Elwenspoek, M.C., Supervisor
  • Herek, J.L., Supervisor
  • Gomez Rivas, J., Supervisor
  • Vos, W.L., Supervisor
Date of Award25 Apr 2013
Place of PublicationZutphen
Publisher
Print ISBNs978-90-77209-70-7
StatePublished - 25 Apr 2013

Fingerprint

electron beams
silicon dioxide
theses
antennas
gold
impurities
nanofabrication
coating
wire
optics
coatings
optical properties
fabrication
shift
geometry
wavelengths
metals
spectroscopy
interactions

Keywords

  • IR-86033
  • METIS-295831

Cite this

Acar, H., & Acar, H. (2013). Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition Zutphen: Wöhrmann Print Service
Acar, H. ; Acar, Hakki. / Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition. Zutphen : Wöhrmann Print Service, 2013. 99 p.
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abstract = "The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. These properties enable us to produce complex, three-dimensional materials even on non-flat substrates in a rapid fashion. However, to fabricate plasmonic materials with EBID one needs to overcome some difficulties and limitations. The major challenge to solve is the impurity issue of the deposited metallic structures. We circumvent the impurity problem by deposition of silica instead of a metal. Metallic nanostructures are obtained by subsequent conformal thin gold film coating. At the end of the coating process we obtain a core-shell type plasmonic structures. Additionally with the local deposition feature of EBID we load the gap of plasmonic split-wire gold nanoantennas. The loading is established with silica deposition. The gap field of the nanoantennas are loaded with various amount of silica. The optical properties of the loaded antennas are investigated with CL spectroscopy. The results reveal that the gap loading shifts the antenna resonance towards longer wavelengths as a function of the amount of deposited silica. Light-matter interaction related studies beyond the classical limits of the optics (nanophotonics) is a broad field. Both fundamental and applied nanophotonics investigations require state-of-the-art nanostructures with various geometries and material properties to push the boundaries. The work in this thesis demonstrates that EBID is an attractive nanofabrication technique to produce nanostructures that are three-dimensional, tunable (active or passive), with different materials, on different types of surface.",
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Acar, H & Acar, H 2013, 'Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition', University of Twente, Zutphen.

Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition. / Acar, H.; Acar, Hakki.

Zutphen : Wöhrmann Print Service, 2013. 99 p.

Research output: ScientificPhD Thesis - Research external, graduation UT

TY - THES

T1 - Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition

AU - Acar,H.

AU - Acar,Hakki

PY - 2013/4/25

Y1 - 2013/4/25

N2 - The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. These properties enable us to produce complex, three-dimensional materials even on non-flat substrates in a rapid fashion. However, to fabricate plasmonic materials with EBID one needs to overcome some difficulties and limitations. The major challenge to solve is the impurity issue of the deposited metallic structures. We circumvent the impurity problem by deposition of silica instead of a metal. Metallic nanostructures are obtained by subsequent conformal thin gold film coating. At the end of the coating process we obtain a core-shell type plasmonic structures. Additionally with the local deposition feature of EBID we load the gap of plasmonic split-wire gold nanoantennas. The loading is established with silica deposition. The gap field of the nanoantennas are loaded with various amount of silica. The optical properties of the loaded antennas are investigated with CL spectroscopy. The results reveal that the gap loading shifts the antenna resonance towards longer wavelengths as a function of the amount of deposited silica. Light-matter interaction related studies beyond the classical limits of the optics (nanophotonics) is a broad field. Both fundamental and applied nanophotonics investigations require state-of-the-art nanostructures with various geometries and material properties to push the boundaries. The work in this thesis demonstrates that EBID is an attractive nanofabrication technique to produce nanostructures that are three-dimensional, tunable (active or passive), with different materials, on different types of surface.

AB - The work described in this thesis was shaped by the goal---coming up new approaches to fabricate plasmonic materials with electron beam induced deposition (EBID). One-step, bottom-up and direct-write are typical adjectives that are used to indicate the advantageous properties of this technique. These properties enable us to produce complex, three-dimensional materials even on non-flat substrates in a rapid fashion. However, to fabricate plasmonic materials with EBID one needs to overcome some difficulties and limitations. The major challenge to solve is the impurity issue of the deposited metallic structures. We circumvent the impurity problem by deposition of silica instead of a metal. Metallic nanostructures are obtained by subsequent conformal thin gold film coating. At the end of the coating process we obtain a core-shell type plasmonic structures. Additionally with the local deposition feature of EBID we load the gap of plasmonic split-wire gold nanoantennas. The loading is established with silica deposition. The gap field of the nanoantennas are loaded with various amount of silica. The optical properties of the loaded antennas are investigated with CL spectroscopy. The results reveal that the gap loading shifts the antenna resonance towards longer wavelengths as a function of the amount of deposited silica. Light-matter interaction related studies beyond the classical limits of the optics (nanophotonics) is a broad field. Both fundamental and applied nanophotonics investigations require state-of-the-art nanostructures with various geometries and material properties to push the boundaries. The work in this thesis demonstrates that EBID is an attractive nanofabrication technique to produce nanostructures that are three-dimensional, tunable (active or passive), with different materials, on different types of surface.

KW - IR-86033

KW - METIS-295831

M3 - PhD Thesis - Research external, graduation UT

SN - 978-90-77209-70-7

PB - Wöhrmann Print Service

ER -

Acar H, Acar H. Fabrication of plasmonic nanostructures with electron beam induced deposition. Zutphen: Wöhrmann Print Service, 2013. 99 p.