Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games (ECAG 2008)

Anton Nijholt (Editor), Ronald Poppe (Editor)

Research output: Book/ReportBook editingAcademic

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Abstract

In this workshop of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition (FG 2008), the emphasis is on research on facial and bodily expressions for the control and adaptation of games. We distinguish between two forms of expressions, depending on whether the user has the initiative and consciously uses his or her movements and expressions to control the interface, or whether the application takes the initiative to adapt itself to the affective state of the user as it can be interpreted from the user’s expressive behavior. Hence, we look at: -Voluntary control: The user consciously produces facial expressions, head movements or body gestures to control a game. This includes commands that allow navigation in the game environment or that allow movements of avatars or changes in their appearances (e.g. showing similar facial expressions on the avatar’s face, transforming body gestures to emotion-related or to emotion-guided activities). Since the expressions and movements are made consciously, they do not necessarily reflect the (affective) state of the gamer. - Involuntary control: The game environment detects, and gives an interpretation to the gamer’s spontaneous facial expression and body pose and uses it to adapt the game to the supposed affective state of the gamer. This adaptation can affect the appearance of the game environment, the interaction modalities, the experience and engagement, the narrative and the strategy that is followed by the game or the game actors. The workshop shows the broad range of applications that address the topic.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationEnschede, the Netherlands
PublisherCentre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT)
Number of pages71
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2008
EventWorkshop on Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games, ECAG 2008 - Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 16 Sep 200816 Sep 2008

Publication series

NameCTIT Workshop Proceedings
PublisherCentre for Telematics and Information Technology University of Twente
VolumeWP08-03
ISSN (Print)1568-7805

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Gesture recognition
Face recognition
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Keywords

  • HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS
  • EWI-13242
  • IR-64923
  • METIS-251134
  • Facial expression
  • Body movement
  • Voluntary control
  • Involuntary control
  • Games
  • Adaptation of games
  • Exertion interfaces
  • User adaptation

Cite this

Nijholt, A., & Poppe, R. (Eds.) (2008). Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games (ECAG 2008). (CTIT Workshop Proceedings; Vol. WP08-03). Enschede, the Netherlands: Centre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT).
Nijholt, Anton (Editor) ; Poppe, Ronald (Editor). / Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games (ECAG 2008). Enschede, the Netherlands : Centre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT), 2008. 71 p. (CTIT Workshop Proceedings).
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abstract = "In this workshop of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition (FG 2008), the emphasis is on research on facial and bodily expressions for the control and adaptation of games. We distinguish between two forms of expressions, depending on whether the user has the initiative and consciously uses his or her movements and expressions to control the interface, or whether the application takes the initiative to adapt itself to the affective state of the user as it can be interpreted from the user’s expressive behavior. Hence, we look at: -Voluntary control: The user consciously produces facial expressions, head movements or body gestures to control a game. This includes commands that allow navigation in the game environment or that allow movements of avatars or changes in their appearances (e.g. showing similar facial expressions on the avatar’s face, transforming body gestures to emotion-related or to emotion-guided activities). Since the expressions and movements are made consciously, they do not necessarily reflect the (affective) state of the gamer. - Involuntary control: The game environment detects, and gives an interpretation to the gamer’s spontaneous facial expression and body pose and uses it to adapt the game to the supposed affective state of the gamer. This adaptation can affect the appearance of the game environment, the interaction modalities, the experience and engagement, the narrative and the strategy that is followed by the game or the game actors. The workshop shows the broad range of applications that address the topic.",
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Nijholt, A & Poppe, R (eds) 2008, Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games (ECAG 2008). CTIT Workshop Proceedings, vol. WP08-03, Centre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT), Enschede, the Netherlands.

Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games (ECAG 2008). / Nijholt, Anton (Editor); Poppe, Ronald (Editor).

Enschede, the Netherlands : Centre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT), 2008. 71 p. (CTIT Workshop Proceedings; Vol. WP08-03).

Research output: Book/ReportBook editingAcademic

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Nijholt A, (ed.), Poppe R, (ed.). Facial and Bodily Expressions for Control and Adaptation of Games (ECAG 2008). Enschede, the Netherlands: Centre for Telematics and Information Technology (CTIT), 2008. 71 p. (CTIT Workshop Proceedings).