Feasiblity of Using Printed Polymer Transducers for Mid-Air Haptic Feedback

P.L.M.J. Van Neer, A.W.F. Volker, A.P. Berkhoff, H.B. Akkerman, T. Schrama, A. Van Breemen, G.H. Gelinck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Recently, there has been considerable interest in the development of ultrasound based mid-air haptic feedback devices. These devices allow for tactile sensations to be induced at any position and time without constraints to human motion, which is useful for virtual user interfaces, augmented/virtual reality and feedback buttons. The haptic feedback mechanism is a combination of acoustic streaming and radiation force. Most work reported in literature induce said effects using matrices of 'standard' single element transducers, which are rigid, bulky and heavy. Our research focuses on the development of printed polymer transducers (PPTs): piezomembranes deposited using a printing process. As PPTs are fully flexible, < 0.25 mm thick and light, they can be easily integrated onto curved surfaces. However, the piezoelectric charge coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) are low compared to regular PZT5A/H, making it challenging to achieve the required sound pressure. This work investigates the feasibility of using PPTs for haptic feedback using simulations and laser vibrometer- and acoustic measurements. The peak pressure produced by our chosen array design was calculated to amount to radiation forces approximately 10x larger than the tactile radiation force threshold reported in literature. Thus using PPTs for haptic feedback appears feasible.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)
PublisherIEEE
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-5386-3425-7
ISBN (Print)978-1-5386-3426-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes
EventIEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2018 - Poropia Hotel, Kobe, Japan
Duration: 22 Oct 201825 Oct 2018

Publication series

Name
ISSN (Electronic)1948-5727

Conference

ConferenceIEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2018
Abbreviated titleIUS 2018
CountryJapan
CityKobe
Period22/10/1825/10/18

Fingerprint

transducers
air
polymers
acoustic streaming
buttons
virtual reality
vibration meters
curved surfaces
acoustic measurement
touch
radiation
sound pressure
sound waves
printing
thresholds
coefficients
matrices
lasers
simulation

Keywords

  • acoustic streaming
  • flexible ultrasound sources
  • mid-air haptic feedback
  • PVDF
  • radiation force

Cite this

Van Neer, P. L. M. J., Volker, A. W. F., Berkhoff, A. P., Akkerman, H. B., Schrama, T., Van Breemen, A., & Gelinck, G. H. (2018). Feasiblity of Using Printed Polymer Transducers for Mid-Air Haptic Feedback. In 2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS) [8579980] IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2018.8579980
Van Neer, P.L.M.J. ; Volker, A.W.F. ; Berkhoff, A.P. ; Akkerman, H.B. ; Schrama, T. ; Van Breemen, A. ; Gelinck, G.H. / Feasiblity of Using Printed Polymer Transducers for Mid-Air Haptic Feedback. 2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS). IEEE, 2018.
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abstract = "Recently, there has been considerable interest in the development of ultrasound based mid-air haptic feedback devices. These devices allow for tactile sensations to be induced at any position and time without constraints to human motion, which is useful for virtual user interfaces, augmented/virtual reality and feedback buttons. The haptic feedback mechanism is a combination of acoustic streaming and radiation force. Most work reported in literature induce said effects using matrices of 'standard' single element transducers, which are rigid, bulky and heavy. Our research focuses on the development of printed polymer transducers (PPTs): piezomembranes deposited using a printing process. As PPTs are fully flexible, < 0.25 mm thick and light, they can be easily integrated onto curved surfaces. However, the piezoelectric charge coefficients of P(VDF-TrFE) are low compared to regular PZT5A/H, making it challenging to achieve the required sound pressure. This work investigates the feasibility of using PPTs for haptic feedback using simulations and laser vibrometer- and acoustic measurements. The peak pressure produced by our chosen array design was calculated to amount to radiation forces approximately 10x larger than the tactile radiation force threshold reported in literature. Thus using PPTs for haptic feedback appears feasible.",
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Van Neer, PLMJ, Volker, AWF, Berkhoff, AP, Akkerman, HB, Schrama, T, Van Breemen, A & Gelinck, GH 2018, Feasiblity of Using Printed Polymer Transducers for Mid-Air Haptic Feedback. in 2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)., 8579980, IEEE, IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, IUS 2018, Kobe, Japan, 22/10/18. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2018.8579980

Feasiblity of Using Printed Polymer Transducers for Mid-Air Haptic Feedback. / Van Neer, P.L.M.J.; Volker, A.W.F.; Berkhoff, A.P.; Akkerman, H.B.; Schrama, T.; Van Breemen, A.; Gelinck, G.H.

2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS). IEEE, 2018. 8579980.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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BT - 2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS)

PB - IEEE

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Van Neer PLMJ, Volker AWF, Berkhoff AP, Akkerman HB, Schrama T, Van Breemen A et al. Feasiblity of Using Printed Polymer Transducers for Mid-Air Haptic Feedback. In 2018 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium (IUS). IEEE. 2018. 8579980 https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2018.8579980