Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
30 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Focus groups are a qualitative research method helping researchers collect and analyze information from practitioners in industry, in order to better understand how a Requirements Engineering (RE) phenomenon happens from the perspective of those working in the field. It is useful in both exploratory and confirmatory studies. While focus groups have been popular in studies of other disciplines where a researcher investigates ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘how’ aspects of a phenomenon of interest in practical context, the potential of this research method is under-exploited in RE. One reason could be that computer science, software engineering and Information Systems (IS) programs in most universities do relatively little to prepare their master students and PhD researchers on the use of this research method. As a result, the method is partly understood and is sub-optimally or incorrectly applied, or avoided altogether. This may translate in a missed opportunity for RE researchers to engage with practitioners in industry-elevant research that could be both done in costeffective and pragmatic way. This mini-tutorial provides some practical suggestions on how to evaluate the fitness of focus group research techniques to a research context, how to design a good enough focus-group-research process, how to counter validity threats and how to report and publish the results.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationREFSQ-JP 2015
Subtitle of host publicationREFSQ Workshops, Research Method Track, and Poster Track
PublisherCEUR
Pages211-216
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2 Mar 2015
Event21st International Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality 2015 - ATLANTIC Congress Hotel, Essen, Germany
Duration: 23 Mar 201526 Mar 2015
Conference number: 21
https://refsq.org/2015/

Publication series

NameCEUR Workshop Proceedings
PublisherCEUR
Volume1342
ISSN (Print)1613-0073

Conference

Conference21st International Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality 2015
Abbreviated titleREFSQ 2015
CountryGermany
CityEssen
Period23/03/1526/03/15
Internet address

Fingerprint

research method
engineering
costs
Group
industry research
research process
fitness
computer science
qualitative method
qualitative research
information system
pragmatics
threat
industry
university
student

Keywords

  • EWI-26929
  • confirmatory case study
  • threats to validity
  • practitioners’ perceptions
  • Qualitative Research Methods
  • generalizability
  • METIS-316881
  • Focus Groups
  • Industry-relevant research
  • Empirical Software Engineering
  • Empirical Evaluation
  • IR-100178
  • Exploratory case study

Cite this

Daneva, M. (2015). Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research. In REFSQ-JP 2015: REFSQ Workshops, Research Method Track, and Poster Track (pp. 211-216). (CEUR Workshop Proceedings; Vol. 1342). CEUR.
Daneva, Maia. / Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research. REFSQ-JP 2015: REFSQ Workshops, Research Method Track, and Poster Track. CEUR, 2015. pp. 211-216 (CEUR Workshop Proceedings).
@inproceedings{36b6cba376d848f99ed90a197c6a1e5f,
title = "Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research",
abstract = "Focus groups are a qualitative research method helping researchers collect and analyze information from practitioners in industry, in order to better understand how a Requirements Engineering (RE) phenomenon happens from the perspective of those working in the field. It is useful in both exploratory and confirmatory studies. While focus groups have been popular in studies of other disciplines where a researcher investigates ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘how’ aspects of a phenomenon of interest in practical context, the potential of this research method is under-exploited in RE. One reason could be that computer science, software engineering and Information Systems (IS) programs in most universities do relatively little to prepare their master students and PhD researchers on the use of this research method. As a result, the method is partly understood and is sub-optimally or incorrectly applied, or avoided altogether. This may translate in a missed opportunity for RE researchers to engage with practitioners in industry-elevant research that could be both done in costeffective and pragmatic way. This mini-tutorial provides some practical suggestions on how to evaluate the fitness of focus group research techniques to a research context, how to design a good enough focus-group-research process, how to counter validity threats and how to report and publish the results.",
keywords = "EWI-26929, confirmatory case study, threats to validity, practitioners’ perceptions, Qualitative Research Methods, generalizability, METIS-316881, Focus Groups, Industry-relevant research, Empirical Software Engineering, Empirical Evaluation, IR-100178, Exploratory case study",
author = "Maia Daneva",
year = "2015",
month = "3",
day = "2",
language = "English",
series = "CEUR Workshop Proceedings",
publisher = "CEUR",
pages = "211--216",
booktitle = "REFSQ-JP 2015",

}

Daneva, M 2015, Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research. in REFSQ-JP 2015: REFSQ Workshops, Research Method Track, and Poster Track. CEUR Workshop Proceedings, vol. 1342, CEUR, pp. 211-216, 21st International Working Conference on Requirements Engineering: Foundation for Software Quality 2015, Essen, Germany, 23/03/15.

Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research. / Daneva, Maia.

REFSQ-JP 2015: REFSQ Workshops, Research Method Track, and Poster Track. CEUR, 2015. p. 211-216 (CEUR Workshop Proceedings; Vol. 1342).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research

AU - Daneva, Maia

PY - 2015/3/2

Y1 - 2015/3/2

N2 - Focus groups are a qualitative research method helping researchers collect and analyze information from practitioners in industry, in order to better understand how a Requirements Engineering (RE) phenomenon happens from the perspective of those working in the field. It is useful in both exploratory and confirmatory studies. While focus groups have been popular in studies of other disciplines where a researcher investigates ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘how’ aspects of a phenomenon of interest in practical context, the potential of this research method is under-exploited in RE. One reason could be that computer science, software engineering and Information Systems (IS) programs in most universities do relatively little to prepare their master students and PhD researchers on the use of this research method. As a result, the method is partly understood and is sub-optimally or incorrectly applied, or avoided altogether. This may translate in a missed opportunity for RE researchers to engage with practitioners in industry-elevant research that could be both done in costeffective and pragmatic way. This mini-tutorial provides some practical suggestions on how to evaluate the fitness of focus group research techniques to a research context, how to design a good enough focus-group-research process, how to counter validity threats and how to report and publish the results.

AB - Focus groups are a qualitative research method helping researchers collect and analyze information from practitioners in industry, in order to better understand how a Requirements Engineering (RE) phenomenon happens from the perspective of those working in the field. It is useful in both exploratory and confirmatory studies. While focus groups have been popular in studies of other disciplines where a researcher investigates ‘why’, ‘what’ and ‘how’ aspects of a phenomenon of interest in practical context, the potential of this research method is under-exploited in RE. One reason could be that computer science, software engineering and Information Systems (IS) programs in most universities do relatively little to prepare their master students and PhD researchers on the use of this research method. As a result, the method is partly understood and is sub-optimally or incorrectly applied, or avoided altogether. This may translate in a missed opportunity for RE researchers to engage with practitioners in industry-elevant research that could be both done in costeffective and pragmatic way. This mini-tutorial provides some practical suggestions on how to evaluate the fitness of focus group research techniques to a research context, how to design a good enough focus-group-research process, how to counter validity threats and how to report and publish the results.

KW - EWI-26929

KW - confirmatory case study

KW - threats to validity

KW - practitioners’ perceptions

KW - Qualitative Research Methods

KW - generalizability

KW - METIS-316881

KW - Focus Groups

KW - Industry-relevant research

KW - Empirical Software Engineering

KW - Empirical Evaluation

KW - IR-100178

KW - Exploratory case study

M3 - Conference contribution

T3 - CEUR Workshop Proceedings

SP - 211

EP - 216

BT - REFSQ-JP 2015

PB - CEUR

ER -

Daneva M. Focus group: cost-effective and methodologically sound ways to get practitioners involved in your empirical RE research. In REFSQ-JP 2015: REFSQ Workshops, Research Method Track, and Poster Track. CEUR. 2015. p. 211-216. (CEUR Workshop Proceedings).