Forewarned is forearmed: Conserving self-control strength to resist social influence

L. Janssen, B.M. Fennis, Adriaan T.H. Pruyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademic

Abstract

Recent research has shown that resisting persuasion involves active self-regulation. Resisting an influence attempt consumes self-regulatory resources, and in a state of self-regulatory resource depletion, people become more susceptible to (unwanted) influence attempts. However, the present studies show that a forewarning of an impending influence attempt prompts depleted individuals to conserve what is left of their regulatory resources and thus promotes self-regulatory efficiency. As a result, when these individuals are subsequently confronted with a persuasive request, they comply less (Experiments 1 and 3), and generate more counterarguments (Experiment 2) than their depleted counterparts who were not forewarned and thus did not conserve their resources, and they are as able as non-depleted participants to resist persuasion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)911-921
JournalJournal of experimental social psychology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Persuasive Communication
self-control
persuasion
resources
experiment
self-regulation
Research
efficiency

Keywords

  • IR-73302

Cite this

Janssen, L. ; Fennis, B.M. ; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H. / Forewarned is forearmed: Conserving self-control strength to resist social influence. In: Journal of experimental social psychology. 2010 ; Vol. 46, No. 6. pp. 911-921.
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Forewarned is forearmed: Conserving self-control strength to resist social influence. / Janssen, L.; Fennis, B.M.; Pruyn, Adriaan T.H.

In: Journal of experimental social psychology, Vol. 46, No. 6, 2010, p. 911-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademic

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