Gas bubbles electrolytically generated at microcavity electrodes (MCE) used for the measurement of the dynamic surface tension in liquids

A. Volanschi*, W. Olthuis, P. Bergveld

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
66 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A new method is proposed for the measurement of dynamic surface tension in aqueous solutions. The advantage of this method with respect to the classical method based on sparging is that the use of gas pumps is avoided, resulting in a miniaturised system. This method is based on the in-situ generation of gas bubbles by means of electrolysis at MicroCavity Electrodes (MCE). As a consequence of electrode surface shaping, a single nucleation site for gas bubbles is created. The MCE is used simultaneously as a bubble actuator (generator) and as a bubble size and/or frequency sensor. Measurement results prove the suitability of the electrolytical method for the monitoring of the dynamic surface tension in aqueous solutions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe 8th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators and Eurosensors IX
Subtitle of host publicationdigest of technical papers, June 25-29, 1995, Stockholm, Sweden
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherIEEE
Pages385-388
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)91-630-3473-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 1995
EventTransducers '95 - Eurosensors IX: 1995 8th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators and Eurosensors - Stockholm, Sweden
Duration: 25 Jun 199529 Jun 1995
Conference number: 9

Conference

ConferenceTransducers '95 - Eurosensors IX: 1995 8th International Conference on Solid-State Sensors and Actuators and Eurosensors
CountrySweden
CityStockholm
Period25/06/9529/06/95

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Gas bubbles electrolytically generated at microcavity electrodes (MCE) used for the measurement of the dynamic surface tension in liquids'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this