Habituation effects on Somatosensory Event-related Potentials (SEPs) elicited by painful electrical stimuli

C.M. van Rijn, M.L.A. Jongsma, E. van den Broeke, S. Postma, R. van der Lubbe, J.R. Buitenweg, M. Arns, R. Quian Quiroga, H. van Goor, M. Luckers, O.H.G. Wilder-Smith

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractAcademic

    Abstract

    Background and Aims: Pain perception is typically measured by questionnaires and behavioural responses. Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs), however, provide a direct measure of stimulus processing in the brain. We studied how stimulus repetition influences the SEPs.

    Methods: A multi-channel EEG was recorded (band pass 0.1−100Hz, sample frequency 1000Hz) from 11 volunteers. Electrical stimuli were applied to the middle phalange of the left ring finger. Each trial consisted of 30 stimuli (1 s duration); inter-stimulus interval of 4 seconds. Three trials were recorded, corresponding with subjective intensity levels 5 (pain detection), 7 (moderate pain) and 9 (pain tolerance). Electric stimuli thus ranged from 1 to 25 mA. Mean amplitudes were extracted from single EEG epochs at Cz: N1: 115–125 ms, P2: 185–195 ms, N2: 195–205 ms and P3: 250–270 ms.

    Results and Discussion: The N1 component of the SEP decreased between the first and second stimulus. The P3 wave decreased slower; over 4 to 5 stimuli. For the amplitude of the N1 no differences were observed between the three VAS scores. For those of the P3, the amplitudes of the VAS 5 were lower than those of the two higher VAS scores. The amplitude of the N1 reaching an asymptotic level after the second stimulus in the trains, is consistent with those of many earlier studies [ref: J. Kekoni]. The slow habituation of the P3 component contrasts the sensitization in subjective VAS scores found in a parallel experiment. It will be interesting to study whether this SEP habituation differs between chronic pain patients and healthy volunteers.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)S72-S72
    JournalPain
    Volume10
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2006
    EventPain in Europe V 2006 - Istanbul, Turkey
    Duration: 13 Sep 200616 Sep 2006
    Conference number: 5

    Fingerprint

    Evoked Potentials
    Pain
    Electroencephalography
    Pain Perception
    Somatosensory Evoked Potentials
    Chronic Pain
    Fingers
    Volunteers
    Healthy Volunteers
    Brain

    Keywords

    • METIS-235011

    Cite this

    van Rijn, C.M. ; Jongsma, M.L.A. ; van den Broeke, E. ; Postma, S. ; van der Lubbe, R. ; Buitenweg, J.R. ; Arns, M. ; Quian Quiroga, R. ; van Goor, H. ; Luckers, M. ; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G. / Habituation effects on Somatosensory Event-related Potentials (SEPs) elicited by painful electrical stimuli. In: Pain. 2006 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. S72-S72.
    @article{46289cfaf4214b3094b34c64d1fc4d51,
    title = "Habituation effects on Somatosensory Event-related Potentials (SEPs) elicited by painful electrical stimuli",
    abstract = "Background and Aims: Pain perception is typically measured by questionnaires and behavioural responses. Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs), however, provide a direct measure of stimulus processing in the brain. We studied how stimulus repetition influences the SEPs.Methods: A multi-channel EEG was recorded (band pass 0.1−100Hz, sample frequency 1000Hz) from 11 volunteers. Electrical stimuli were applied to the middle phalange of the left ring finger. Each trial consisted of 30 stimuli (1 s duration); inter-stimulus interval of 4 seconds. Three trials were recorded, corresponding with subjective intensity levels 5 (pain detection), 7 (moderate pain) and 9 (pain tolerance). Electric stimuli thus ranged from 1 to 25 mA. Mean amplitudes were extracted from single EEG epochs at Cz: N1: 115–125 ms, P2: 185–195 ms, N2: 195–205 ms and P3: 250–270 ms.Results and Discussion: The N1 component of the SEP decreased between the first and second stimulus. The P3 wave decreased slower; over 4 to 5 stimuli. For the amplitude of the N1 no differences were observed between the three VAS scores. For those of the P3, the amplitudes of the VAS 5 were lower than those of the two higher VAS scores. The amplitude of the N1 reaching an asymptotic level after the second stimulus in the trains, is consistent with those of many earlier studies [ref: J. Kekoni]. The slow habituation of the P3 component contrasts the sensitization in subjective VAS scores found in a parallel experiment. It will be interesting to study whether this SEP habituation differs between chronic pain patients and healthy volunteers.",
    keywords = "METIS-235011",
    author = "{van Rijn}, C.M. and M.L.A. Jongsma and {van den Broeke}, E. and S. Postma and {van der Lubbe}, R. and J.R. Buitenweg and M. Arns and {Quian Quiroga}, R. and {van Goor}, H. and M. Luckers and O.H.G. Wilder-Smith",
    year = "2006",
    doi = "10.1016/S1090-3801(06)60272-3",
    language = "English",
    volume = "10",
    pages = "S72--S72",
    journal = "Pain",
    issn = "0304-3959",
    publisher = "Elsevier",
    number = "1",

    }

    van Rijn, CM, Jongsma, MLA, van den Broeke, E, Postma, S, van der Lubbe, R, Buitenweg, JR, Arns, M, Quian Quiroga, R, van Goor, H, Luckers, M & Wilder-Smith, OHG 2006, 'Habituation effects on Somatosensory Event-related Potentials (SEPs) elicited by painful electrical stimuli', Pain, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. S72-S72. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1090-3801(06)60272-3

    Habituation effects on Somatosensory Event-related Potentials (SEPs) elicited by painful electrical stimuli. / van Rijn, C.M.; Jongsma, M.L.A.; van den Broeke, E.; Postma, S.; van der Lubbe, R.; Buitenweg, J.R.; Arns, M.; Quian Quiroga, R.; van Goor, H.; Luckers, M.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    In: Pain, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2006, p. S72-S72.

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractAcademic

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Habituation effects on Somatosensory Event-related Potentials (SEPs) elicited by painful electrical stimuli

    AU - van Rijn, C.M.

    AU - Jongsma, M.L.A.

    AU - van den Broeke, E.

    AU - Postma, S.

    AU - van der Lubbe, R.

    AU - Buitenweg, J.R.

    AU - Arns, M.

    AU - Quian Quiroga, R.

    AU - van Goor, H.

    AU - Luckers, M.

    AU - Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - Background and Aims: Pain perception is typically measured by questionnaires and behavioural responses. Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs), however, provide a direct measure of stimulus processing in the brain. We studied how stimulus repetition influences the SEPs.Methods: A multi-channel EEG was recorded (band pass 0.1−100Hz, sample frequency 1000Hz) from 11 volunteers. Electrical stimuli were applied to the middle phalange of the left ring finger. Each trial consisted of 30 stimuli (1 s duration); inter-stimulus interval of 4 seconds. Three trials were recorded, corresponding with subjective intensity levels 5 (pain detection), 7 (moderate pain) and 9 (pain tolerance). Electric stimuli thus ranged from 1 to 25 mA. Mean amplitudes were extracted from single EEG epochs at Cz: N1: 115–125 ms, P2: 185–195 ms, N2: 195–205 ms and P3: 250–270 ms.Results and Discussion: The N1 component of the SEP decreased between the first and second stimulus. The P3 wave decreased slower; over 4 to 5 stimuli. For the amplitude of the N1 no differences were observed between the three VAS scores. For those of the P3, the amplitudes of the VAS 5 were lower than those of the two higher VAS scores. The amplitude of the N1 reaching an asymptotic level after the second stimulus in the trains, is consistent with those of many earlier studies [ref: J. Kekoni]. The slow habituation of the P3 component contrasts the sensitization in subjective VAS scores found in a parallel experiment. It will be interesting to study whether this SEP habituation differs between chronic pain patients and healthy volunteers.

    AB - Background and Aims: Pain perception is typically measured by questionnaires and behavioural responses. Somatosensory Evoked Potentials (SEPs), however, provide a direct measure of stimulus processing in the brain. We studied how stimulus repetition influences the SEPs.Methods: A multi-channel EEG was recorded (band pass 0.1−100Hz, sample frequency 1000Hz) from 11 volunteers. Electrical stimuli were applied to the middle phalange of the left ring finger. Each trial consisted of 30 stimuli (1 s duration); inter-stimulus interval of 4 seconds. Three trials were recorded, corresponding with subjective intensity levels 5 (pain detection), 7 (moderate pain) and 9 (pain tolerance). Electric stimuli thus ranged from 1 to 25 mA. Mean amplitudes were extracted from single EEG epochs at Cz: N1: 115–125 ms, P2: 185–195 ms, N2: 195–205 ms and P3: 250–270 ms.Results and Discussion: The N1 component of the SEP decreased between the first and second stimulus. The P3 wave decreased slower; over 4 to 5 stimuli. For the amplitude of the N1 no differences were observed between the three VAS scores. For those of the P3, the amplitudes of the VAS 5 were lower than those of the two higher VAS scores. The amplitude of the N1 reaching an asymptotic level after the second stimulus in the trains, is consistent with those of many earlier studies [ref: J. Kekoni]. The slow habituation of the P3 component contrasts the sensitization in subjective VAS scores found in a parallel experiment. It will be interesting to study whether this SEP habituation differs between chronic pain patients and healthy volunteers.

    KW - METIS-235011

    U2 - 10.1016/S1090-3801(06)60272-3

    DO - 10.1016/S1090-3801(06)60272-3

    M3 - Meeting Abstract

    VL - 10

    SP - S72-S72

    JO - Pain

    JF - Pain

    SN - 0304-3959

    IS - 1

    ER -