How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations?

Daphne Eleonora Karreman, Geke Dina Simone Ludden, Elisabeth M.A.G. van Dijk, Vanessa Evers

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    In this paper, we describe a field study with a tour guide robot that guided visitors through a historical site. Our focus was to determine how a robot’s orientation behaviour influenced visitors’ orientation and the formations groups of visitors formed around the robot. During the study a remotecontrolled robot gave short guided tours and explained some points of interest in the hall of Festivities in the Royal Alcázar in Seville (Spain). To get insight into visitors’ reactions to the robot’s non-verbal orientation behaviour, two orientations of the robot were tested; either the robot was oriented with its front towards the visitors, or the robot was oriented with its front towards the point of interest. From the study we learned that people reacted strongly to the orientation of the robot. We found that visitors tended to follow the robot tour guide from a greater distance (more than 3 meters away from the robot) more frequently when the robot was oriented towards the visitors than when it was oriented towards the point of interest. Further, when the robot was oriented towards the point of interest, people knew where to look and walked towards the robot more often. On the other hand, people also lost interest in the robot more often when it was oriented towards the point of interest. The analysis of visitors’ orientation and formations led to design guidelines for effective robot guide behaviour.
    Original languageUndefined
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015
    Place of PublicationCanterbury, UK
    PublisherUniversity of Kent
    Pages7
    Number of pages8
    ISBN (Print)not assigned
    Publication statusPublished - 21 Apr 2015
    Event4th International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction 2015 - Canterbury, United Kingdom
    Duration: 21 Apr 201522 Apr 2015

    Publication series

    Name
    PublisherUniversity of Kent

    Conference

    Conference4th International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction 2015
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    CityCanterbury
    Period21/04/1522/04/15

    Keywords

    • EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/2007-2013
    • EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/288235
    • METIS-315062
    • IR-98699
    • EWI-26510

    Cite this

    Karreman, D. E., Ludden, G. D. S., van Dijk, E. M. A. G., & Evers, V. (2015). How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations? In Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015 (pp. 7). Canterbury, UK: University of Kent.
    Karreman, Daphne Eleonora ; Ludden, Geke Dina Simone ; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G. ; Evers, Vanessa. / How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations?. Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015. Canterbury, UK : University of Kent, 2015. pp. 7
    @inproceedings{d930e659be024d8996d40d6cf362d213,
    title = "How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations?",
    abstract = "In this paper, we describe a field study with a tour guide robot that guided visitors through a historical site. Our focus was to determine how a robot’s orientation behaviour influenced visitors’ orientation and the formations groups of visitors formed around the robot. During the study a remotecontrolled robot gave short guided tours and explained some points of interest in the hall of Festivities in the Royal Alc{\'a}zar in Seville (Spain). To get insight into visitors’ reactions to the robot’s non-verbal orientation behaviour, two orientations of the robot were tested; either the robot was oriented with its front towards the visitors, or the robot was oriented with its front towards the point of interest. From the study we learned that people reacted strongly to the orientation of the robot. We found that visitors tended to follow the robot tour guide from a greater distance (more than 3 meters away from the robot) more frequently when the robot was oriented towards the visitors than when it was oriented towards the point of interest. Further, when the robot was oriented towards the point of interest, people knew where to look and walked towards the robot more often. On the other hand, people also lost interest in the robot more often when it was oriented towards the point of interest. The analysis of visitors’ orientation and formations led to design guidelines for effective robot guide behaviour.",
    keywords = "EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/2007-2013, EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/288235, METIS-315062, IR-98699, EWI-26510",
    author = "Karreman, {Daphne Eleonora} and Ludden, {Geke Dina Simone} and {van Dijk}, {Elisabeth M.A.G.} and Vanessa Evers",
    note = "eemcs-eprint-26510",
    year = "2015",
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    day = "21",
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    booktitle = "Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015",

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    Karreman, DE, Ludden, GDS, van Dijk, EMAG & Evers, V 2015, How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations? in Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015. University of Kent, Canterbury, UK, pp. 7, 4th International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction 2015, Canterbury, United Kingdom, 21/04/15.

    How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations? / Karreman, Daphne Eleonora; Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Evers, Vanessa.

    Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015. Canterbury, UK : University of Kent, 2015. p. 7.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    TY - GEN

    T1 - How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations?

    AU - Karreman, Daphne Eleonora

    AU - Ludden, Geke Dina Simone

    AU - van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.

    AU - Evers, Vanessa

    N1 - eemcs-eprint-26510

    PY - 2015/4/21

    Y1 - 2015/4/21

    N2 - In this paper, we describe a field study with a tour guide robot that guided visitors through a historical site. Our focus was to determine how a robot’s orientation behaviour influenced visitors’ orientation and the formations groups of visitors formed around the robot. During the study a remotecontrolled robot gave short guided tours and explained some points of interest in the hall of Festivities in the Royal Alcázar in Seville (Spain). To get insight into visitors’ reactions to the robot’s non-verbal orientation behaviour, two orientations of the robot were tested; either the robot was oriented with its front towards the visitors, or the robot was oriented with its front towards the point of interest. From the study we learned that people reacted strongly to the orientation of the robot. We found that visitors tended to follow the robot tour guide from a greater distance (more than 3 meters away from the robot) more frequently when the robot was oriented towards the visitors than when it was oriented towards the point of interest. Further, when the robot was oriented towards the point of interest, people knew where to look and walked towards the robot more often. On the other hand, people also lost interest in the robot more often when it was oriented towards the point of interest. The analysis of visitors’ orientation and formations led to design guidelines for effective robot guide behaviour.

    AB - In this paper, we describe a field study with a tour guide robot that guided visitors through a historical site. Our focus was to determine how a robot’s orientation behaviour influenced visitors’ orientation and the formations groups of visitors formed around the robot. During the study a remotecontrolled robot gave short guided tours and explained some points of interest in the hall of Festivities in the Royal Alcázar in Seville (Spain). To get insight into visitors’ reactions to the robot’s non-verbal orientation behaviour, two orientations of the robot were tested; either the robot was oriented with its front towards the visitors, or the robot was oriented with its front towards the point of interest. From the study we learned that people reacted strongly to the orientation of the robot. We found that visitors tended to follow the robot tour guide from a greater distance (more than 3 meters away from the robot) more frequently when the robot was oriented towards the visitors than when it was oriented towards the point of interest. Further, when the robot was oriented towards the point of interest, people knew where to look and walked towards the robot more often. On the other hand, people also lost interest in the robot more often when it was oriented towards the point of interest. The analysis of visitors’ orientation and formations led to design guidelines for effective robot guide behaviour.

    KW - EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/2007-2013

    KW - EC Grant Agreement nr.: FP7/288235

    KW - METIS-315062

    KW - IR-98699

    KW - EWI-26510

    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - not assigned

    SP - 7

    BT - Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015

    PB - University of Kent

    CY - Canterbury, UK

    ER -

    Karreman DE, Ludden GDS, van Dijk EMAG, Evers V. How can a tour guide robot’s orientation influence visitors’ orientation and formations? In Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on New Frontiers in Human-Robot Interaction, HRI-AISB 2015. Canterbury, UK: University of Kent. 2015. p. 7