How do we engage with activity trackers? a longitudinal study of habito

Rúben Gouveia*, Evangelos Karapanos, Marc Hassenzahl

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on a 10-month in-The-wild study of the adoption, engagement and discontinuation of an activity tracker called Habito, by a sample of 256 users who installed the tracker on their own volition. We found 'readiness' to behavior change to be a strong predictor of adoption (which ranged from 56% to 20%). Among adopters, only a third updated their daily goal, which in turn impacted their physical activity levels. The use of the tracker was dominated by glances - brief, 5-sec sessions where users called the app to check their current activity levels with no further interaction, while users displayed true lack of interest in historical data. Textual feedback proved highly effective in fueling further engagement with the tracker as well as inducing physical activity. We propose three directions for design: designing for different levels of 'readiness', designing for multilayered and playful goal setting, and designing for sustained engagement.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationUbiComp 2015 - Proceedings of the 2015 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages1305-1316
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781450335744
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and 2015 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers - Osaka, Japan
Duration: 7 Sep 201511 Sep 2015

Conference

Conference ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing and 2015 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers
Abbreviated titleUbiComp & ISWC
CountryJapan
CityOsaka
Period7/09/1511/09/15

Keywords

  • Behavior Change Technologies
  • Personal informatics
  • Persuasive Technologies
  • Physical Activity Trackers.

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