Ideology, Economics, and Voter Abstention: Evidence from the European democracies: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association

Erik R. Tillman

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

While there is considerable agreement that economic conditions affect electoral outcomes, there is less agreement as to exactly how. Scholars have spent a great deal of effort exploring the links between economics and vote choice but have generally ignored the potential that economic perceptions could also affect the likelihood of voter abstention. I explore that possibility in this paper. First, I develop a theory of how economic perceptions affect the likelihood of abstention. I argue that the relevant factors in this relationship are one’s retrospective and prospective judgments of the economy and the ideology of the respondent and government. Hypotheses are generated and tested using national election survey data from the United Kingdom, Germany, and the Netherlands. The results show that economic perceptions have an effect on the likelihood of electoral abstention. This effect is mediated by the ideology of the respondent and party and appears to be weakened in situations of greater coalitional complexity.
Original languageUndefined
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventAnnual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association - Chicago, IL
Duration: 15 Apr 200418 Apr 2004

Other

OtherAnnual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association
Period15/04/0418/04/04
OtherApril 15-18 2004

Keywords

  • IR-61268

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