Imagining the Future of Longitudinal HCI Studies: Sensor-Embedded Everyday Objects as Subjective Data Collection Tools

Armagan Karahanoglu*, Geke D.S. Ludden

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Automated data collection has a significant role in collecting reliable longitudinal data in human–computer interaction (HCI) studies that involve human participants. While objective data collection can be obtained by and mediated through personal informatics, subjective data is mostly collected through labour-intensive tools. The potential of sensor-embedded everyday objects as subjective data collection tools is underexplored. Hence, in this chapter, we investigate the use of such products for subjective data collection purposes in longitudinal studies. First, we demonstrate current practices on subjective data collection tools and examine the aforementioned research gap. Following that, we discuss the results of three discussion sessions in which we collected insights from six expert researchers on the enablers and barriers of using sensor-embedded everyday objects as subjective data collection tools. We present our insights with use-case scenarios to communicate what possible roles sensor-embedded everyday objects could have in collecting subjective data in future longitudinal HCI studies and discuss how they could be further developed within the field.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Longitudinal HCI Research
EditorsEvangelos Karapanos, Jens Gerken, Jesper Kjeldskov, Mikael B. Skov
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer
Pages101-120
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-67322-2
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-67321-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Publication series

NameHuman-Computer Interaction Series
PublisherSpringer
ISSN (Print)1571-5035
ISSN (Electronic)2524-4477

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Imagining the Future of Longitudinal HCI Studies: Sensor-Embedded Everyday Objects as Subjective Data Collection Tools'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this