Improving cross-functional communication about product architecture

M. Xie (Editor), Marc Wouters, I.C. Kerssens-van Drongelen, T.S. Durrani (Editor), H.K. Tang (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademic

1 Citation (Scopus)
72 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Product architecture decisions, such as product modularity, component commonality, and design reuse, are important for balancing costs, responsiveness, quality, and other important business objectives. Firms are challenged with complex tradeoffs between competing design priorities, face the need to facilitate communication between functional silos, and to learn from past experiences. In this paper we present a qualitative approach for systematically evaluating the product architecture of an existing product or product family, linking the original architecture objectives and actual experiences. The intended contribution of our research is to present a framework that brings together a diverse set of product architecture-related decisions that are relevant from a business point of view (and not from a technical point of view) and a set of business performance elements. This framework can be used in workshop that improves cross-functional communication about the product architecture of an existing product family, and this results in practical improvement actions for future architecture design projects. Initial experiences with this approach have been obtained in pilots with Philips domestic appliances & personal care, and Philips consumer electronics.
Original languageEnglish
Pages561-565
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventIEEE International Engineering Management Conference, IEMC 2004 - Singapore, Thailand
Duration: 18 Oct 200421 Oct 2004

Conference

ConferenceIEEE International Engineering Management Conference, IEMC 2004
Abbreviated titleIEMC
CountryThailand
CitySingapore
Period18/10/0421/10/04
Other21-21 Oct. 2004

Keywords

  • IR-55808
  • METIS-242253

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