In Vivo Blood Velocity Vector Imaging Using Adaptive Velocity Compounding in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation

Anne E.C.M. Saris*, Hendrik H.G. Hansen, Stein Fekkes, Jan Menssen, Maartje M. Nillesen, Chris L. de Korte

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Visualization and quantification of blood flow are considered important for early detection of atherosclerosis and patient-specific diagnosis and intervention. As conventional Doppler imaging is limited to 1-D velocity estimates, 2-D and 3-D techniques are being developed. We introduce an adaptive velocity compounding technique that estimates the 2-D velocity vector field using predominantly axial displacements estimated by speckle tracking from dual-angle plane wave acquisitions. Straight-vessel experiments with a 7.8-MHz linear array transducer connected to a Verasonics Vantage ultrasound system revealed that the technique performed with a maximum velocity magnitude bias and angle bias of –3.7% (2.8% standard deviation)and –0.16° (0.41° standard deviation), respectively. In vivo, complex flow patterns were visualized in two healthy and three diseased carotid arteries and quantified using a vector complexity measure that increased with increasing wall irregularity. This measure could potentially be a relevant clinical parameter which might aid in early detection of atherosclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1691-1707
Number of pages17
JournalUltrasound in medicine and biology
Volume45
Issue number7
Early online date9 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

compounding
arteries
Carotid Arteries
blood
Atherosclerosis
arteriosclerosis
Carotid Artery Diseases
Transducers
standard deviation
linear arrays
estimates
blood flow
irregularities
vessels
acquisition
flow distribution
transducers
plane waves

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Blood velocity estimation
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Carotid artery
  • Complex flow
  • Doppler imaging
  • Plane wave imaging
  • Vascular ultrasound
  • Vector velocity imaging
  • Velocity compounding

Cite this

Saris, Anne E.C.M. ; Hansen, Hendrik H.G. ; Fekkes, Stein ; Menssen, Jan ; Nillesen, Maartje M. ; de Korte, Chris L. / In Vivo Blood Velocity Vector Imaging Using Adaptive Velocity Compounding in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation. In: Ultrasound in medicine and biology. 2019 ; Vol. 45, No. 7. pp. 1691-1707.
@article{e03a21bc091d453fa76c9270c9e62b49,
title = "In Vivo Blood Velocity Vector Imaging Using Adaptive Velocity Compounding in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation",
abstract = "Visualization and quantification of blood flow are considered important for early detection of atherosclerosis and patient-specific diagnosis and intervention. As conventional Doppler imaging is limited to 1-D velocity estimates, 2-D and 3-D techniques are being developed. We introduce an adaptive velocity compounding technique that estimates the 2-D velocity vector field using predominantly axial displacements estimated by speckle tracking from dual-angle plane wave acquisitions. Straight-vessel experiments with a 7.8-MHz linear array transducer connected to a Verasonics Vantage ultrasound system revealed that the technique performed with a maximum velocity magnitude bias and angle bias of –3.7{\%} (2.8{\%} standard deviation)and –0.16° (0.41° standard deviation), respectively. In vivo, complex flow patterns were visualized in two healthy and three diseased carotid arteries and quantified using a vector complexity measure that increased with increasing wall irregularity. This measure could potentially be a relevant clinical parameter which might aid in early detection of atherosclerosis.",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis, Blood velocity estimation, Cardiovascular disease, Carotid artery, Complex flow, Doppler imaging, Plane wave imaging, Vascular ultrasound, Vector velocity imaging, Velocity compounding",
author = "Saris, {Anne E.C.M.} and Hansen, {Hendrik H.G.} and Stein Fekkes and Jan Menssen and Nillesen, {Maartje M.} and {de Korte}, {Chris L.}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2019.03.008",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "1691--1707",
journal = "Ultrasound in medicine and biology",
issn = "0301-5629",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "7",

}

In Vivo Blood Velocity Vector Imaging Using Adaptive Velocity Compounding in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation. / Saris, Anne E.C.M.; Hansen, Hendrik H.G.; Fekkes, Stein; Menssen, Jan; Nillesen, Maartje M.; de Korte, Chris L.

In: Ultrasound in medicine and biology, Vol. 45, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 1691-1707.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - In Vivo Blood Velocity Vector Imaging Using Adaptive Velocity Compounding in the Carotid Artery Bifurcation

AU - Saris, Anne E.C.M.

AU - Hansen, Hendrik H.G.

AU - Fekkes, Stein

AU - Menssen, Jan

AU - Nillesen, Maartje M.

AU - de Korte, Chris L.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Visualization and quantification of blood flow are considered important for early detection of atherosclerosis and patient-specific diagnosis and intervention. As conventional Doppler imaging is limited to 1-D velocity estimates, 2-D and 3-D techniques are being developed. We introduce an adaptive velocity compounding technique that estimates the 2-D velocity vector field using predominantly axial displacements estimated by speckle tracking from dual-angle plane wave acquisitions. Straight-vessel experiments with a 7.8-MHz linear array transducer connected to a Verasonics Vantage ultrasound system revealed that the technique performed with a maximum velocity magnitude bias and angle bias of –3.7% (2.8% standard deviation)and –0.16° (0.41° standard deviation), respectively. In vivo, complex flow patterns were visualized in two healthy and three diseased carotid arteries and quantified using a vector complexity measure that increased with increasing wall irregularity. This measure could potentially be a relevant clinical parameter which might aid in early detection of atherosclerosis.

AB - Visualization and quantification of blood flow are considered important for early detection of atherosclerosis and patient-specific diagnosis and intervention. As conventional Doppler imaging is limited to 1-D velocity estimates, 2-D and 3-D techniques are being developed. We introduce an adaptive velocity compounding technique that estimates the 2-D velocity vector field using predominantly axial displacements estimated by speckle tracking from dual-angle plane wave acquisitions. Straight-vessel experiments with a 7.8-MHz linear array transducer connected to a Verasonics Vantage ultrasound system revealed that the technique performed with a maximum velocity magnitude bias and angle bias of –3.7% (2.8% standard deviation)and –0.16° (0.41° standard deviation), respectively. In vivo, complex flow patterns were visualized in two healthy and three diseased carotid arteries and quantified using a vector complexity measure that increased with increasing wall irregularity. This measure could potentially be a relevant clinical parameter which might aid in early detection of atherosclerosis.

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Blood velocity estimation

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Carotid artery

KW - Complex flow

KW - Doppler imaging

KW - Plane wave imaging

KW - Vascular ultrasound

KW - Vector velocity imaging

KW - Velocity compounding

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065126436&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2019.03.008

DO - 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2019.03.008

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85065126436

VL - 45

SP - 1691

EP - 1707

JO - Ultrasound in medicine and biology

JF - Ultrasound in medicine and biology

SN - 0301-5629

IS - 7

ER -