Increasing the success rate of interfacial polymerization on hollow fibers by the single-step addition of an intermediate layer

M. Mohammadifakhr, K. Trzaskus, A. J.B. Kemperman, H. D.W. Roesink, J. de Grooth*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

In this paper, we introduce a single-step process that incorporates an intermediate layer on a hollow fiber to enhance the final membrane performance after interfacial polymerization (IP). This intermediate layer is applied during hollow-fiber spinning by complexation of two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. Specifically, in this study, we consider the IP coating process an experimental success for a membrane sample with a NaCl rejection >85%. The IP success rate is defined as the percentage of the samples with a NaCl rejection of >85% within a studied group. The purpose of the intermediate layer is to increase the success rate of IP on the inner surface of the hollow fibers, typically a challenging task due to the cylindrical shape of the fibers. After the application of IP, the pure water permeance and NaCl rejection of the nascent membranes were tested to determine the success rate of IP. The IP success rate was 86–100% for the hollow fibers (HF) with intermediate layer, significantly higher than the 29% success rate achieved for IP on the support without intermediate layer. This surface modification approach is simple, time-efficient, and effective without any need for post-IP optimization that opens up new avenues for further developments for IP based dense hollow fiber membranes.

Original languageEnglish
Article number114581
JournalDesalination
Volume491
Early online date15 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print/First online - 15 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Hollow fiber membrane
  • Interfacial polymerization
  • Intermediate layer
  • One-step process
  • Spinning

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