Inflow from a Cardiopulmonary Assist System to the Pulmonary Artery and Its Implications for Local Hemodynamics—a Computational Fluid Dynamics Study

Kristin Hugenroth*, Felix Krooß, Flutura Hima, Lasse Strudthoff, Rüdger Kopp, Jutta Arens, Sebastian Kalverkamp, Ulrich Steinseifer, Michael Neidlin, Jan Spillner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

When returning blood to the pulmonary artery (PA), the inflow jet interferes with local hemodynamics. We investigated the consequences for several connection scenarios using transient computational fluid dynamics simulations. The PA was derived from CT data. Three aspects were varied: graft flow rate, anastomosis location, and inflow jet path length from anastomosis site to impingement on the PA wall. Lateral anastomosis locations caused abnormal flow distribution between the left and right PA. The central location provided near-physiological distribution but induced higher wall shear stress (WSS). All effects were most pronounced at high graft flows. A central location is beneficial regarding flow distribution, but the resulting high WSS might promote detachment of local thromboembolisms or influence the autonomic nervous innervation. Lateral locations, depending on jet path length, result in lower WSS at the cost of an unfavorable flow distribution that could promote pulmonary vasculature changes. Case-specific decisions and further research are necessary. Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.].

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)842-851
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of cardiovascular translational research
Volume16
Issue number4
Early online date20 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2023

Keywords

  • Artificial lung
  • CFD simulation
  • ECMO
  • Graft connection
  • In silico
  • Lung perfusion
  • Retrograde flow

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