Influenzasneltests voor de huisartsenpraktijk en SEH: analytische accuratesse en meerwaarde

Translated title of the contribution: Influenza point-of-care test in the GP practice and Emergency Department: analytical accuracy and added value

Ruud A.F. Verhees, Suzanne P.M. Lutgens, Ron Kusters, Geert Jan Dinant, Jochen W.L. Cals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

An influenza epidemic can greatly increase the workload in primary care and the emergency department (ED) and can even disrupt the healthcare system. It is difficult to diagnose influenza by history taking and physical examination. A fast diagnosis usinginfluenza point-of-care tests (POCTs) could reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions, diagnostic tests, consultations and hospital admissions. Moreover, length of stay on EDs and length of admission could be shortened. The analytical accuracy of antigen detection tests for influenza is relatively low compared to the well performing RT-PCR assays (sensitivity and specificity approximately 95%). Only 1 randomized controlled trial has shown the effect of a (combined) RT-PCR assay for influenza detection on clinically relevant outcome measures. Observational research suggests that introduction of RT-PCR assays for influenza detection reduces length of stay on the ED and decreased time from sample reception to result. For practical reasons, we should embrace the introduction of RT-PCR assays for influenza detection on EDs. Before POCTs can be implemented in primary care (family medicine) the analytical accuracy and time to receive results should be improved and effects of its clinical impact should be proven.

Original languageDutch
Article numberD3806
Number of pages6
JournalNederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde
Volume163
Publication statusPublished - 29 Aug 2019

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Point-of-Care Systems
Human Influenza
Hospital Emergency Service
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Length of Stay
Primary Health Care
Workload
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Physical Examination
Prescriptions
Referral and Consultation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Delivery of Health Care
Antigens
Sensitivity and Specificity
Research

Cite this

Verhees, R. A. F., Lutgens, S. P. M., Kusters, R., Dinant, G. J., & Cals, J. W. L. (2019). Influenzasneltests voor de huisartsenpraktijk en SEH: analytische accuratesse en meerwaarde. Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde, 163, [D3806].
Verhees, Ruud A.F. ; Lutgens, Suzanne P.M. ; Kusters, Ron ; Dinant, Geert Jan ; Cals, Jochen W.L. / Influenzasneltests voor de huisartsenpraktijk en SEH : analytische accuratesse en meerwaarde. In: Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde. 2019 ; Vol. 163.
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Influenzasneltests voor de huisartsenpraktijk en SEH : analytische accuratesse en meerwaarde. / Verhees, Ruud A.F.; Lutgens, Suzanne P.M.; Kusters, Ron; Dinant, Geert Jan; Cals, Jochen W.L.

In: Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde, Vol. 163, D3806, 29.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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