Integrated Micro- and Nanofluidics: Silicon Revisited: (Keynote Paper)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although silicon may generally not be the material of first choice for applications in the field of fluidics for (bio)chemistry and medicine, the extended toolbox of fabrication methods makes it a very attractive material for the demonstration of microfluidic principles for these fields. In particular, the monocrystalline nature of silicon substrates in combination with anisotropic etching processes, the precise dry-etching techniques and sophisticated thin-film surface micromachining processes, can be used to create a large variety of innovative microstructures. Several examples of such micro- and nanofluidic structures for (bio)chemical and medical analysis will be presented and discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASME 2002 Joint U.S.-European Fluids Engineering Division Conference
Subtitle of host publicationMontreal, Quebec, Canada, July 14–18, 2002
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Pages1199-1204
ISBN (Electronic)0-7918-3600-2
ISBN (Print)0-7918-3615-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002
EventASME 2002 Joint U.S.-European Fluids Engineering Division Conference 2002 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: 14 Jul 200218 Jul 2002

Conference

ConferenceASME 2002 Joint U.S.-European Fluids Engineering Division Conference 2002
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period14/07/0218/07/02

Keywords

  • Nanofluidics
  • Silicon

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Integrated Micro- and Nanofluidics: Silicon Revisited: (Keynote Paper)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this