Integrating Airborne LiDAR and Terrestrial Laser Scanner forest parameters for accurate above-ground biomass/carbon estimation in Ayer Hitam tropical forest, Malaysia

Muluken N. Bazezew (Corresponding Author), Yousif A. Hussin, E.H. Kloosterman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parameters of individual trees can be measured from LiDAR data provided that the laser points are dense enough to distinguish tree crowns. Retrieving tree parameters for above-ground biomass (AGB) valuation of the complex biophysical tropical forests using LiDAR technology is a major undertaking, and yet needs vital effort. Integration of Airborne LiDAR Scanner (ALS) and Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) data for estimation of tree AGB at a single-tree level has been investigated in part of the tropical forest of Malaysia. According to the complete tree-crown detection potential of ALS and TLS, the forest canopy was cross-sectioned into upper and lower canopy layers. In a first step, multiresolution segmentation of the ALS canopy height model (CHM) was deployed to delineate upper canopy tree crowns. Results showed a 73% segmentation accuracy and permissible to detect 57% of field-measured trees. Two-way tree height validations were executed, viz. ALS-based upper and TLS-based lower canopy tree heights. The root mean square error (RMSE) for upper canopy trees height was 3.24 m (20.18%), and the bias was –1.20 m (–7.45%). For lower canopy trees height, RMSE of 1.45 m (14.77%) and bias of 0.42 m (4.29%) were obtained. In a second step, diameter at breast height (DBH) of individual tree stems detected from TLS data was measured. The RMSE obtained was 1.30 cm (6.52%), which was as nearly accurate as manually measured-DBH. In a third step, ALS-detected trees were co-registered and linked with the corresponding tree stems detected by TLS for DBH use. Lastly, an empirical regression model was developed for AGB estimated from a field-based method using an independent variable derived from ALS and TLS data. The result suggests that traditional field-methods underestimate AGB or carbon with the bias –0.289 (–3.53%) Mg, according for approximately 11%. Conversely, integrative use of ALS and TLS can enhance the capability of estimating more accurately AGB or carbon stock of the tropical forests.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-652
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation
Volume73
Early online date8 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Integrating Airborne LiDAR and Terrestrial Laser Scanner forest parameters for accurate above-ground biomass/carbon estimation in Ayer Hitam tropical forest, Malaysia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this