Interplay between microdynamics and macrorheology in vesicle suspensions

B. Kaoui, R.J.W. Jonk, Jens Dieter Rolf Harting

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The microscopic dynamics of objects suspended in a fluid determines the macroscopic rheology of a suspension. For example, as shown by Danker and Misbah [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2007, 98, 088104], the viscosity of a dilute suspension of fluid-filled vesicles is a non-monotonic function of the viscosity contrast (the ratio between the viscosities of the internal encapsulated and the external suspending fluids) and exhibits a minimum at the critical point of the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition. By performing numerical simulations, we recover this effect and demonstrate that it persists for a wide range of vesicle parameters such as the concentration, membrane deformability, or swelling degree. We also explain why other numerical and experimental studies lead to contradicting results. Furthermore, our simulations show that this effect even persists in non-dilute and confined suspensions, but that it becomes less pronounced at higher concentrations and for more swollen vesicles. For dense suspensions and for spherical (circular in 2D) vesicles, the intrinsic viscosity tends to depend weakly on the viscosity contrast.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4735-4742
Number of pages8
JournalSoft matter
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Suspensions
Viscosity
viscosity
Fluids
fluids
Barreling
Formability
Rheology
rheology
swelling
Swelling
critical point
simulation
membranes
Membranes
Computer simulation

Keywords

  • IR-95078
  • METIS-308386

Cite this

Kaoui, B. ; Jonk, R.J.W. ; Harting, Jens Dieter Rolf. / Interplay between microdynamics and macrorheology in vesicle suspensions. In: Soft matter. 2014 ; Vol. 10. pp. 4735-4742.
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Interplay between microdynamics and macrorheology in vesicle suspensions. / Kaoui, B.; Jonk, R.J.W.; Harting, Jens Dieter Rolf.

In: Soft matter, Vol. 10, 2014, p. 4735-4742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interplay between microdynamics and macrorheology in vesicle suspensions

AU - Kaoui, B.

AU - Jonk, R.J.W.

AU - Harting, Jens Dieter Rolf

PY - 2014

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N2 - The microscopic dynamics of objects suspended in a fluid determines the macroscopic rheology of a suspension. For example, as shown by Danker and Misbah [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2007, 98, 088104], the viscosity of a dilute suspension of fluid-filled vesicles is a non-monotonic function of the viscosity contrast (the ratio between the viscosities of the internal encapsulated and the external suspending fluids) and exhibits a minimum at the critical point of the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition. By performing numerical simulations, we recover this effect and demonstrate that it persists for a wide range of vesicle parameters such as the concentration, membrane deformability, or swelling degree. We also explain why other numerical and experimental studies lead to contradicting results. Furthermore, our simulations show that this effect even persists in non-dilute and confined suspensions, but that it becomes less pronounced at higher concentrations and for more swollen vesicles. For dense suspensions and for spherical (circular in 2D) vesicles, the intrinsic viscosity tends to depend weakly on the viscosity contrast.

AB - The microscopic dynamics of objects suspended in a fluid determines the macroscopic rheology of a suspension. For example, as shown by Danker and Misbah [Phys. Rev. Lett., 2007, 98, 088104], the viscosity of a dilute suspension of fluid-filled vesicles is a non-monotonic function of the viscosity contrast (the ratio between the viscosities of the internal encapsulated and the external suspending fluids) and exhibits a minimum at the critical point of the tank-treading-to-tumbling transition. By performing numerical simulations, we recover this effect and demonstrate that it persists for a wide range of vesicle parameters such as the concentration, membrane deformability, or swelling degree. We also explain why other numerical and experimental studies lead to contradicting results. Furthermore, our simulations show that this effect even persists in non-dilute and confined suspensions, but that it becomes less pronounced at higher concentrations and for more swollen vesicles. For dense suspensions and for spherical (circular in 2D) vesicles, the intrinsic viscosity tends to depend weakly on the viscosity contrast.

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