Is an accelerating robot perceived as energetic or as gaining in speed?

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Abstract

Previous studies have found that basic movement characteristics of a robot influence the emotional attributes people perceive independent of the embodiment of the motion (e.g. iCat vs. Roomba). Here, with a very simple LEGO robot, we replicate these associations between levels of acceleration and curvature and the extent to which positive and negative emotions are attributed. Importantly, we also show that these associations might not be valid. Prior to the emotional questionnaires participants were asked neutral questions on what they deemed relevant observations pertaining to the different robot motions. Only 3% of the remarks coincided with the emotional terms found in the questionnaires. HRI researchers interested in what people attribute to robot motion should be mindful of participant heuristics and experimenter biases. We provide some suggestions how to create experiments that are robust against these biases.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHRI '14 Proceedings of the 2014 9th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction, Bielefeld, March 3-6 2014
Place of PublicationBielefeld
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages258-259
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-2658-2
Publication statusPublished - 3 Mar 2014
Event9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2014 - Bielefeld, Germany
Duration: 3 Mar 20146 Mar 2014
Conference number: 9

Publication series

Name
PublisherACM

Conference

Conference9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2014
Abbreviated titleHRI
CountryGermany
CityBielefeld
Period3/03/146/03/14

Fingerprint

Emotions
Research Personnel
Surveys and Questionnaires
Heuristics

Keywords

  • METIS-306378
  • IR-92520

Cite this

Noordzij, M. L., Schmettow, M., & Lorijn, M. (2014). Is an accelerating robot perceived as energetic or as gaining in speed? In HRI '14 Proceedings of the 2014 9th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction, Bielefeld, March 3-6 2014 (pp. 258-259). Bielefeld: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).
Noordzij, Matthijs Leendert ; Schmettow, Martin ; Lorijn, Melle. / Is an accelerating robot perceived as energetic or as gaining in speed?. HRI '14 Proceedings of the 2014 9th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction, Bielefeld, March 3-6 2014. Bielefeld : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014. pp. 258-259
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Noordzij, ML, Schmettow, M & Lorijn, M 2014, Is an accelerating robot perceived as energetic or as gaining in speed? in HRI '14 Proceedings of the 2014 9th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction, Bielefeld, March 3-6 2014. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Bielefeld, pp. 258-259, 9th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, HRI 2014, Bielefeld, Germany, 3/03/14.

Is an accelerating robot perceived as energetic or as gaining in speed? / Noordzij, Matthijs Leendert; Schmettow, Martin; Lorijn, Melle.

HRI '14 Proceedings of the 2014 9th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction, Bielefeld, March 3-6 2014. Bielefeld : Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014. p. 258-259.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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N2 - Previous studies have found that basic movement characteristics of a robot influence the emotional attributes people perceive independent of the embodiment of the motion (e.g. iCat vs. Roomba). Here, with a very simple LEGO robot, we replicate these associations between levels of acceleration and curvature and the extent to which positive and negative emotions are attributed. Importantly, we also show that these associations might not be valid. Prior to the emotional questionnaires participants were asked neutral questions on what they deemed relevant observations pertaining to the different robot motions. Only 3% of the remarks coincided with the emotional terms found in the questionnaires. HRI researchers interested in what people attribute to robot motion should be mindful of participant heuristics and experimenter biases. We provide some suggestions how to create experiments that are robust against these biases.

AB - Previous studies have found that basic movement characteristics of a robot influence the emotional attributes people perceive independent of the embodiment of the motion (e.g. iCat vs. Roomba). Here, with a very simple LEGO robot, we replicate these associations between levels of acceleration and curvature and the extent to which positive and negative emotions are attributed. Importantly, we also show that these associations might not be valid. Prior to the emotional questionnaires participants were asked neutral questions on what they deemed relevant observations pertaining to the different robot motions. Only 3% of the remarks coincided with the emotional terms found in the questionnaires. HRI researchers interested in what people attribute to robot motion should be mindful of participant heuristics and experimenter biases. We provide some suggestions how to create experiments that are robust against these biases.

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Noordzij ML, Schmettow M, Lorijn M. Is an accelerating robot perceived as energetic or as gaining in speed? In HRI '14 Proceedings of the 2014 9th ACM/IEEE international conference on Human-robot interaction, Bielefeld, March 3-6 2014. Bielefeld: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). 2014. p. 258-259