It takes time to tango: The relative importance of values versus traits in consumer brand relationships

Ronald J. J. Voorn (Corresponding Author), Gerrita van der Veen, Thomas J. L. van Rompay, Ad T. H. Pruyn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Brand managers have several options in their quest to connect their brands with consumers. They may stress functional brand attributes and benefits, their brand's personality traits, or their brand's values (the human values attached to the brand). Which of these is most important to consumers is an open question, however. This article proposes that values may take on increased importance over time, as long‐term relationships (in general) require more than just getting the job done (functional aspect) or a sense of recognition (trait correspondence). What is required most of all is a correspondence between long‐term objectives and goals in life. Values are arguably the most relevant factor in longer relationships. An experiment was put together to determine if this is indeed the case. The results of our study suggest that values are indeed considered more important than traits in the case of longer relationships and that this is particularly true with decisions regarding prospective relationships and in the case of services.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)532-541
JournalJournal of Consumer Behaviour
Volume17
Issue number6
Early online date3 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D

Cite this

@article{32e2c4ce17f040b1be97e9c2c6b5a243,
title = "It takes time to tango: The relative importance of values versus traits in consumer brand relationships",
abstract = "Brand managers have several options in their quest to connect their brands with consumers. They may stress functional brand attributes and benefits, their brand's personality traits, or their brand's values (the human values attached to the brand). Which of these is most important to consumers is an open question, however. This article proposes that values may take on increased importance over time, as long‐term relationships (in general) require more than just getting the job done (functional aspect) or a sense of recognition (trait correspondence). What is required most of all is a correspondence between long‐term objectives and goals in life. Values are arguably the most relevant factor in longer relationships. An experiment was put together to determine if this is indeed the case. The results of our study suggest that values are indeed considered more important than traits in the case of longer relationships and that this is particularly true with decisions regarding prospective relationships and in the case of services.",
keywords = "UT-Hybrid-D",
author = "Voorn, {Ronald J. J.} and {van der Veen}, Gerrita and {van Rompay}, {Thomas J. L.} and Pruyn, {Ad T. H.}",
note = "Wiley deal",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1002/cb.1737",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "532--541",
journal = "Journal of Consumer Behaviour",
issn = "1472-0817",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

It takes time to tango: The relative importance of values versus traits in consumer brand relationships. / Voorn, Ronald J. J. (Corresponding Author); van der Veen, Gerrita; van Rompay, Thomas J. L.; Pruyn, Ad T. H.

In: Journal of Consumer Behaviour, Vol. 17, No. 6, 11.2018, p. 532-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - It takes time to tango: The relative importance of values versus traits in consumer brand relationships

AU - Voorn, Ronald J. J.

AU - van der Veen, Gerrita

AU - van Rompay, Thomas J. L.

AU - Pruyn, Ad T. H.

N1 - Wiley deal

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Brand managers have several options in their quest to connect their brands with consumers. They may stress functional brand attributes and benefits, their brand's personality traits, or their brand's values (the human values attached to the brand). Which of these is most important to consumers is an open question, however. This article proposes that values may take on increased importance over time, as long‐term relationships (in general) require more than just getting the job done (functional aspect) or a sense of recognition (trait correspondence). What is required most of all is a correspondence between long‐term objectives and goals in life. Values are arguably the most relevant factor in longer relationships. An experiment was put together to determine if this is indeed the case. The results of our study suggest that values are indeed considered more important than traits in the case of longer relationships and that this is particularly true with decisions regarding prospective relationships and in the case of services.

AB - Brand managers have several options in their quest to connect their brands with consumers. They may stress functional brand attributes and benefits, their brand's personality traits, or their brand's values (the human values attached to the brand). Which of these is most important to consumers is an open question, however. This article proposes that values may take on increased importance over time, as long‐term relationships (in general) require more than just getting the job done (functional aspect) or a sense of recognition (trait correspondence). What is required most of all is a correspondence between long‐term objectives and goals in life. Values are arguably the most relevant factor in longer relationships. An experiment was put together to determine if this is indeed the case. The results of our study suggest that values are indeed considered more important than traits in the case of longer relationships and that this is particularly true with decisions regarding prospective relationships and in the case of services.

KW - UT-Hybrid-D

U2 - 10.1002/cb.1737

DO - 10.1002/cb.1737

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 532

EP - 541

JO - Journal of Consumer Behaviour

JF - Journal of Consumer Behaviour

SN - 1472-0817

IS - 6

ER -