Knowledge management practices for stimulating incremental and radical product innovation

Petra Andries, Sophie De Winne, Anna Christina Bos-Nehles

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

According to Agarwal and Helfat (2009, p. 282) strategic renewal includes “the process, content, and outcome of refreshment or replacement of attributes of an organization that have the potential to substantially affect its long-term prospects”. This is a broad definition, which can include many forms of renewal activities, in response to both external opportunities/threats and internal strengths/weaknesses. Examples of renewal activities currently receiving much attention are innovation activities, creating opportunities for both incremental and radical innovation. Crucial to innovation and the subsequent development of sustainable competitive advantage is the organization’s ability to create and transfer knowledge (Nonaka, 1991, 1994). This ability depends upon the extent to which the organization succeeds in combining and exchanging existing knowledge among employees (Nahapiet and Ghoshal, 1998). Several studies have shown that the implementation of knowledge management practices that stimulate individual employees to develop their knowledge base (e.g. job rotation, training, financial incentives for new ideas), exchange their knowledge with others (e.g. teamwork, employee participation, suggestion schemes) or make their knowledge part of the organizational memory (e.g. input of knowledge in lessons learned databases) can be fruitful in this respect (e.g. Chen and Huang, 2009; Greiner, Böhmann and Krcmar, 2007; Lopez-Cabrales, Perez-Luno and Cabrera, 2009; Wang and Noe, 2010; Zhou, Hong and Liu, 2013). These practices incite a learning process, the creation of fresh insights and the discovery of new opportunities among employees, important antecedents of new knowledge creation and innovation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStrategic Renewal
Subtitle of host publicationCore concepts, antecedents, and micro foundations
EditorsAybars Tuncdogan, Adam Lindgreen, Henk Volberda, Frans Van den Bosch
Place of PublicationMilton Park, Abingdon, Oxon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter5
Pages100-119
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-429-05786-1
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Incremental
Employees
Product innovation
Knowledge management practice
Renewal
Employee participation
Radical innovation
Team work
Innovation activities
Threat
Incremental innovation
Knowledge innovation
Knowledge creation
Innovation
Data base
Organizational memory
Sustainable competitive advantage
Replacement
Job rotation
Knowledge exchange

Cite this

Andries, P., De Winne, S., & Bos-Nehles, A. C. (2019). Knowledge management practices for stimulating incremental and radical product innovation. In A. Tuncdogan, A. Lindgreen, H. Volberda, & F. Van den Bosch (Eds.), Strategic Renewal: Core concepts, antecedents, and micro foundations (pp. 100-119). Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge.
Andries, Petra ; De Winne, Sophie ; Bos-Nehles, Anna Christina. / Knowledge management practices for stimulating incremental and radical product innovation. Strategic Renewal: Core concepts, antecedents, and micro foundations. editor / Aybars Tuncdogan ; Adam Lindgreen ; Henk Volberda ; Frans Van den Bosch. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2019. pp. 100-119
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Andries, P, De Winne, S & Bos-Nehles, AC 2019, Knowledge management practices for stimulating incremental and radical product innovation. in A Tuncdogan, A Lindgreen, H Volberda & F Van den Bosch (eds), Strategic Renewal: Core concepts, antecedents, and micro foundations. Routledge, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, pp. 100-119.

Knowledge management practices for stimulating incremental and radical product innovation. / Andries, Petra; De Winne, Sophie; Bos-Nehles, Anna Christina.

Strategic Renewal: Core concepts, antecedents, and micro foundations. ed. / Aybars Tuncdogan; Adam Lindgreen; Henk Volberda; Frans Van den Bosch. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon : Routledge, 2019. p. 100-119.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

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AU - De Winne, Sophie

AU - Bos-Nehles, Anna Christina

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AB - According to Agarwal and Helfat (2009, p. 282) strategic renewal includes “the process, content, and outcome of refreshment or replacement of attributes of an organization that have the potential to substantially affect its long-term prospects”. This is a broad definition, which can include many forms of renewal activities, in response to both external opportunities/threats and internal strengths/weaknesses. Examples of renewal activities currently receiving much attention are innovation activities, creating opportunities for both incremental and radical innovation. Crucial to innovation and the subsequent development of sustainable competitive advantage is the organization’s ability to create and transfer knowledge (Nonaka, 1991, 1994). This ability depends upon the extent to which the organization succeeds in combining and exchanging existing knowledge among employees (Nahapiet and Ghoshal, 1998). Several studies have shown that the implementation of knowledge management practices that stimulate individual employees to develop their knowledge base (e.g. job rotation, training, financial incentives for new ideas), exchange their knowledge with others (e.g. teamwork, employee participation, suggestion schemes) or make their knowledge part of the organizational memory (e.g. input of knowledge in lessons learned databases) can be fruitful in this respect (e.g. Chen and Huang, 2009; Greiner, Böhmann and Krcmar, 2007; Lopez-Cabrales, Perez-Luno and Cabrera, 2009; Wang and Noe, 2010; Zhou, Hong and Liu, 2013). These practices incite a learning process, the creation of fresh insights and the discovery of new opportunities among employees, important antecedents of new knowledge creation and innovation.

M3 - Chapter

SP - 100

EP - 119

BT - Strategic Renewal

A2 - Tuncdogan, Aybars

A2 - Lindgreen, Adam

A2 - Volberda, Henk

A2 - Van den Bosch, Frans

PB - Routledge

CY - Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon

ER -

Andries P, De Winne S, Bos-Nehles AC. Knowledge management practices for stimulating incremental and radical product innovation. In Tuncdogan A, Lindgreen A, Volberda H, Van den Bosch F, editors, Strategic Renewal: Core concepts, antecedents, and micro foundations. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. 2019. p. 100-119