Label-Free Prostate Cancer Detection by Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles Using Raman Spectroscopy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Mammalian cells release extracellular vesicles (EVs) into their microenvironment that travel the entire body along the stream of bodily fluids. EVs contain a wide range of biomolecules. The transported cargo varies depending on the EV origin. Knowledge of the origin and chemical composition of EVs can potentially be used as a biomarker to detect, stage, and monitor diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of EVs as a prostate cancer biomarker. A Raman optical tweezer was employed to obtain Raman signatures from four types of EV samples, which were red blood cell- and platelet-derived EVs of healthy donors and the prostate cancer cell lines- (PC3 and LNCaP) derived EVs. EVs' Raman spectra could be clearly separated/classified into distinct groups using principal component analysis (PCA) which permits the discrimination of the investigated EV subtypes. These findings may provide new methodology to detect and monitor early stage cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11290-11296
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical chemistry
Volume90
Issue number19
Early online date29 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Raman spectroscopy
Labels
Cells
Optical tweezers
Biomolecules
Biomarkers
Tumor Biomarkers
Platelets
Principal component analysis
Raman scattering
Blood
Fluids
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • UT-Hybrid-D

Cite this

@article{8a6b9c875bab4e09b0650de6cd630980,
title = "Label-Free Prostate Cancer Detection by Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles Using Raman Spectroscopy",
abstract = "Mammalian cells release extracellular vesicles (EVs) into their microenvironment that travel the entire body along the stream of bodily fluids. EVs contain a wide range of biomolecules. The transported cargo varies depending on the EV origin. Knowledge of the origin and chemical composition of EVs can potentially be used as a biomarker to detect, stage, and monitor diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of EVs as a prostate cancer biomarker. A Raman optical tweezer was employed to obtain Raman signatures from four types of EV samples, which were red blood cell- and platelet-derived EVs of healthy donors and the prostate cancer cell lines- (PC3 and LNCaP) derived EVs. EVs' Raman spectra could be clearly separated/classified into distinct groups using principal component analysis (PCA) which permits the discrimination of the investigated EV subtypes. These findings may provide new methodology to detect and monitor early stage cancer.",
keywords = "UT-Hybrid-D",
author = "Wooje Lee and Afroditi Nanou and Linda Rikkert and Coumans, {Frank A.W.} and Cees Otto and Terstappen, {Leon W.M.M.} and Offerhaus, {Herman L.}",
note = "ACS deal",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1021/acs.analchem.8b01831",
language = "English",
volume = "90",
pages = "11290--11296",
journal = "Analytical chemistry",
issn = "0003-2700",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
number = "19",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Label-Free Prostate Cancer Detection by Characterization of Extracellular Vesicles Using Raman Spectroscopy

AU - Lee, Wooje

AU - Nanou, Afroditi

AU - Rikkert, Linda

AU - Coumans, Frank A.W.

AU - Otto, Cees

AU - Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.

AU - Offerhaus, Herman L.

N1 - ACS deal

PY - 2018/10/2

Y1 - 2018/10/2

N2 - Mammalian cells release extracellular vesicles (EVs) into their microenvironment that travel the entire body along the stream of bodily fluids. EVs contain a wide range of biomolecules. The transported cargo varies depending on the EV origin. Knowledge of the origin and chemical composition of EVs can potentially be used as a biomarker to detect, stage, and monitor diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of EVs as a prostate cancer biomarker. A Raman optical tweezer was employed to obtain Raman signatures from four types of EV samples, which were red blood cell- and platelet-derived EVs of healthy donors and the prostate cancer cell lines- (PC3 and LNCaP) derived EVs. EVs' Raman spectra could be clearly separated/classified into distinct groups using principal component analysis (PCA) which permits the discrimination of the investigated EV subtypes. These findings may provide new methodology to detect and monitor early stage cancer.

AB - Mammalian cells release extracellular vesicles (EVs) into their microenvironment that travel the entire body along the stream of bodily fluids. EVs contain a wide range of biomolecules. The transported cargo varies depending on the EV origin. Knowledge of the origin and chemical composition of EVs can potentially be used as a biomarker to detect, stage, and monitor diseases. In this paper, we demonstrate the potential of EVs as a prostate cancer biomarker. A Raman optical tweezer was employed to obtain Raman signatures from four types of EV samples, which were red blood cell- and platelet-derived EVs of healthy donors and the prostate cancer cell lines- (PC3 and LNCaP) derived EVs. EVs' Raman spectra could be clearly separated/classified into distinct groups using principal component analysis (PCA) which permits the discrimination of the investigated EV subtypes. These findings may provide new methodology to detect and monitor early stage cancer.

KW - UT-Hybrid-D

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053177267&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/labelfree-prostate-cancer-detection-characterization-extracellular-vesicles-using-raman-spectroscopy

U2 - 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b01831

DO - 10.1021/acs.analchem.8b01831

M3 - Article

VL - 90

SP - 11290

EP - 11296

JO - Analytical chemistry

JF - Analytical chemistry

SN - 0003-2700

IS - 19

ER -