Lysozyme self-assembles into amyloid networks that support cartilage tissue formation

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

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40 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose: No cure is available for repair of damaged cartilage. Once damaged, cartilage will continue to degenerate, resulting in immobile and painful joints. Treatments are limited to symptom relief, while tissue engineering approaches fail to produce cartilage comparable to native articular cartilage in terms of strength and modulus. In this project, we investigated the use of self-assembling proteins as scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering. These so-called amy-loid networks consist of amyloid fibrils forming physical cross-links. The fibrils self-assemble from proteins by forming inter-protein B-sheets.
Amyloid networks resemble the extracellular matrix of cartilage
since the strength and Young’s modulus of the fibrils is comparable to
those of collagen and the networks are hydrogels. We therefore
hypothesized that amyloid networks can be used as scaffold material for
cartilage tissue engineering.
Original languageEnglish
Article number794
Pages (from-to)S465
JournalOsteoarthritis and cartilage
Volume24
Issue numbersupplement 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2016
Event2016 OARSI World Congress on Osteoarthrtis - Amsterdam RAI, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Duration: 31 Mar 20163 Apr 2016

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Cartilage
Muramidase
Catalyst supports
Amyloid
Tissue Engineering
Enzymes
Tissue
Tissue engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Proteins
Hydrogels
Elastic Modulus
Articular Cartilage
Extracellular Matrix
Collagen
Joints
Repair
Elastic moduli

Keywords

  • IR-103806
  • METIS-314882

Cite this

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title = "Lysozyme self-assembles into amyloid networks that support cartilage tissue formation",
abstract = "Purpose: No cure is available for repair of damaged cartilage. Once damaged, cartilage will continue to degenerate, resulting in immobile and painful joints. Treatments are limited to symptom relief, while tissue engineering approaches fail to produce cartilage comparable to native articular cartilage in terms of strength and modulus. In this project, we investigated the use of self-assembling proteins as scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering. These so-called amy-loid networks consist of amyloid fibrils forming physical cross-links. The fibrils self-assemble from proteins by forming inter-protein B-sheets.Amyloid networks resemble the extracellular matrix of cartilagesince the strength and Young’s modulus of the fibrils is comparable tothose of collagen and the networks are hydrogels. We thereforehypothesized that amyloid networks can be used as scaffold material forcartilage tissue engineering.",
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author = "{van Dalen}, M. and J. Post and M. Karperien and Claessens, {Mireille M.A.E.}",
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Lysozyme self-assembles into amyloid networks that support cartilage tissue formation. / van Dalen, M.; Post, J.; Karperien, M.; Claessens, Mireille M.A.E.

In: Osteoarthritis and cartilage, Vol. 24, No. supplement 1, 794, 04.2016, p. S465.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting AbstractOther research output

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lysozyme self-assembles into amyloid networks that support cartilage tissue formation

AU - van Dalen, M.

AU - Post, J.

AU - Karperien, M.

AU - Claessens, Mireille M.A.E.

PY - 2016/4

Y1 - 2016/4

N2 - Purpose: No cure is available for repair of damaged cartilage. Once damaged, cartilage will continue to degenerate, resulting in immobile and painful joints. Treatments are limited to symptom relief, while tissue engineering approaches fail to produce cartilage comparable to native articular cartilage in terms of strength and modulus. In this project, we investigated the use of self-assembling proteins as scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering. These so-called amy-loid networks consist of amyloid fibrils forming physical cross-links. The fibrils self-assemble from proteins by forming inter-protein B-sheets.Amyloid networks resemble the extracellular matrix of cartilagesince the strength and Young’s modulus of the fibrils is comparable tothose of collagen and the networks are hydrogels. We thereforehypothesized that amyloid networks can be used as scaffold material forcartilage tissue engineering.

AB - Purpose: No cure is available for repair of damaged cartilage. Once damaged, cartilage will continue to degenerate, resulting in immobile and painful joints. Treatments are limited to symptom relief, while tissue engineering approaches fail to produce cartilage comparable to native articular cartilage in terms of strength and modulus. In this project, we investigated the use of self-assembling proteins as scaffold material for cartilage tissue engineering. These so-called amy-loid networks consist of amyloid fibrils forming physical cross-links. The fibrils self-assemble from proteins by forming inter-protein B-sheets.Amyloid networks resemble the extracellular matrix of cartilagesince the strength and Young’s modulus of the fibrils is comparable tothose of collagen and the networks are hydrogels. We thereforehypothesized that amyloid networks can be used as scaffold material forcartilage tissue engineering.

KW - IR-103806

KW - METIS-314882

U2 - 10.1016/j.joca.2016.01.848

DO - 10.1016/j.joca.2016.01.848

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 24

SP - S465

JO - Osteoarthritis and cartilage

JF - Osteoarthritis and cartilage

SN - 1063-4584

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