Managing Circular Building Projects

    Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

    172 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    As the most resource intensive and wasteful industry, the construction sector is causing enormous socio-environmental problems. The root causes of these problems can be traced back to the way building projects are managed. Buildings are generally designed as static structures, but quickly demolished when no longer needed. The concept of a circular economy, alternatively, poses that economic development and profitability are possible without continuously growing pressure on the environment through a combination of reduce, reuse and recycle activities. This thesis therefore aims to develop actionable knowledge on managing circular building projects through exploring how information can be used to reduce, reuse and/or recycle building materials. Each of the chapters examines an essential, information intensive management task that contributes to one or more of these material strategies. The first three chapters do this from a demolition management perspective: they cover information usages for material recovery and reuse decisions (Chapter 1), subsequent coordination of demolition activities (Chapter 2) and the support of those activities with BIM-based methods (Chapter 3). The second three chapters do so from a design management perspective: they deal with information usages in generating reversible design proposals with BIM-based methods (Chapter 4), evaluating those proposals with a virtual reality-based method (Chapter 5) and a reflective serious gaming approach (Chapter 6). Two key management strategies were, accordingly, derived to close material loops. Demolition managers need to use information from previous and later design stages; design managers similarly need to use information from previous and later demolition stages. These 'a priori' and 'a posteriori' information uses provide an actionable response to many of the socio-environmental problems that can be attributed to today’s construction industry.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • University of Twente
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Adriaanse, Adriaan Maria, Supervisor
    • Voordijk, Johannes T., Supervisor
    Award date16 May 2019
    Place of PublicationEnschede
    Publisher
    Print ISBNs978-90-365-4770-3
    Electronic ISBNs978-90-365-4770-3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2019

    Fingerprint

    Demolition
    Information use
    Managers
    Construction industry
    Virtual reality
    Profitability
    Recovery
    Economics
    Industry

    Keywords

    • circular economy
    • project management
    • information use
    • buildings
    • demolition management
    • design management

    Cite this

    van den Berg, Marc Casper. / Managing Circular Building Projects. Enschede : University of Twente, 2019. 243 p.
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    abstract = "As the most resource intensive and wasteful industry, the construction sector is causing enormous socio-environmental problems. The root causes of these problems can be traced back to the way building projects are managed. Buildings are generally designed as static structures, but quickly demolished when no longer needed. The concept of a circular economy, alternatively, poses that economic development and profitability are possible without continuously growing pressure on the environment through a combination of reduce, reuse and recycle activities. This thesis therefore aims to develop actionable knowledge on managing circular building projects through exploring how information can be used to reduce, reuse and/or recycle building materials. Each of the chapters examines an essential, information intensive management task that contributes to one or more of these material strategies. The first three chapters do this from a demolition management perspective: they cover information usages for material recovery and reuse decisions (Chapter 1), subsequent coordination of demolition activities (Chapter 2) and the support of those activities with BIM-based methods (Chapter 3). The second three chapters do so from a design management perspective: they deal with information usages in generating reversible design proposals with BIM-based methods (Chapter 4), evaluating those proposals with a virtual reality-based method (Chapter 5) and a reflective serious gaming approach (Chapter 6). Two key management strategies were, accordingly, derived to close material loops. Demolition managers need to use information from previous and later design stages; design managers similarly need to use information from previous and later demolition stages. These 'a priori' and 'a posteriori' information uses provide an actionable response to many of the socio-environmental problems that can be attributed to today’s construction industry.",
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    van den Berg, MC 2019, 'Managing Circular Building Projects', Doctor of Philosophy, University of Twente, Enschede. https://doi.org/10.3990/1.9789036547703

    Managing Circular Building Projects. / van den Berg, Marc Casper.

    Enschede : University of Twente, 2019. 243 p.

    Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

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    T1 - Managing Circular Building Projects

    AU - van den Berg, Marc Casper

    PY - 2019

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    KW - project management

    KW - information use

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