Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators

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Abstract

Integrated high accuracy long-range position sensing will be of paramount importance for high potential applications like future probe memories [1, 2] and probemicroscopy scanners provided that nm position accuracy can be obtained over 10’s of μm displacement range. In this work design, fabrication and measurements of an integrated incremental capacitive long-range position sensor for microactuators are presented. The sensor consists of two periodic geometries (period ≈ 8-16 μm) on a slider (connected to a microactuator) and one on a sensestructure (fixed) with gap-distance of ~ 1 μm. A relative displacement between the two results in a periodic change in capacitance. In normal operation (i.e. the Incremental Capacitance Measurement Mode (ICMM)) the change in capacitance vs. slider displacement is measured directly using a charge amplifier and synchronous detection at 1 MHz. Adjusting the minimal gap-distance by additional sense-actuators increases the capacitance and the S-N Ratio. In a second mode of operation, Constant Capacitance Measurement Mode (CCMM), the gap between sense-structures and slider is actively controlled to keep the sensor-capacitance at a pre-set value for all positions of the slider. Thus, the control signal (i.e. the voltage for the sense-actuator) becomes a measure for the position of the slider. Our results indicate that the position measurement accuracy is increased to ~10 nm in CCM operation compared to 46 nm in normal operation [3]. Further results (using normal operation) show that the realized capacitive sensor can be used in ICMM for frequencies above the resonance frequency (fres~1.6KHz) of the device and therefore also characterizes the important dynamic properties of the test-vehicle.
Original languageUndefined
Pages760-763
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventAnnual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004 - Veldhoven, Netherlands
Duration: 25 Nov 200426 Nov 2004

Workshop

WorkshopAnnual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004
Abbreviated titleSAFE
CountryNetherlands
CityVeldhoven
Period25/11/0426/11/04

Keywords

  • nano positioning
  • micromachined capacitive position sensor
  • synchronous detection
  • periodic geometries
  • IR-59586

Cite this

Kuijpers, A. A., Krijnen, G. J. M., Wiegerink, R. J., Lammerink, T. S. J., & Elwenspoek, M. C. (2004). Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators. 760-763. Paper presented at Annual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004, Veldhoven, Netherlands.
Kuijpers, A.A. ; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M. ; Wiegerink, Remco J. ; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J. ; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt. / Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators. Paper presented at Annual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004, Veldhoven, Netherlands.
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title = "Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators",
abstract = "Integrated high accuracy long-range position sensing will be of paramount importance for high potential applications like future probe memories [1, 2] and probemicroscopy scanners provided that nm position accuracy can be obtained over 10’s of μm displacement range. In this work design, fabrication and measurements of an integrated incremental capacitive long-range position sensor for microactuators are presented. The sensor consists of two periodic geometries (period ≈ 8-16 μm) on a slider (connected to a microactuator) and one on a sensestructure (fixed) with gap-distance of ~ 1 μm. A relative displacement between the two results in a periodic change in capacitance. In normal operation (i.e. the Incremental Capacitance Measurement Mode (ICMM)) the change in capacitance vs. slider displacement is measured directly using a charge amplifier and synchronous detection at 1 MHz. Adjusting the minimal gap-distance by additional sense-actuators increases the capacitance and the S-N Ratio. In a second mode of operation, Constant Capacitance Measurement Mode (CCMM), the gap between sense-structures and slider is actively controlled to keep the sensor-capacitance at a pre-set value for all positions of the slider. Thus, the control signal (i.e. the voltage for the sense-actuator) becomes a measure for the position of the slider. Our results indicate that the position measurement accuracy is increased to ~10 nm in CCM operation compared to 46 nm in normal operation [3]. Further results (using normal operation) show that the realized capacitive sensor can be used in ICMM for frequencies above the resonance frequency (fres~1.6KHz) of the device and therefore also characterizes the important dynamic properties of the test-vehicle.",
keywords = "nano positioning, micromachined capacitive position sensor, synchronous detection, periodic geometries, IR-59586",
author = "A.A. Kuijpers and Krijnen, {Gijsbertus J.M.} and Wiegerink, {Remco J.} and Lammerink, {Theodorus S.J.} and Elwenspoek, {Michael Curt}",
year = "2004",
language = "Undefined",
pages = "760--763",
note = "null ; Conference date: 25-11-2004 Through 26-11-2004",

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Kuijpers, AA, Krijnen, GJM, Wiegerink, RJ, Lammerink, TSJ & Elwenspoek, MC 2004, 'Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators' Paper presented at Annual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004, Veldhoven, Netherlands, 25/11/04 - 26/11/04, pp. 760-763.

Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators. / Kuijpers, A.A.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt.

2004. 760-763 Paper presented at Annual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004, Veldhoven, Netherlands.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators

AU - Kuijpers, A.A.

AU - Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

AU - Wiegerink, Remco J.

AU - Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.

AU - Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Integrated high accuracy long-range position sensing will be of paramount importance for high potential applications like future probe memories [1, 2] and probemicroscopy scanners provided that nm position accuracy can be obtained over 10’s of μm displacement range. In this work design, fabrication and measurements of an integrated incremental capacitive long-range position sensor for microactuators are presented. The sensor consists of two periodic geometries (period ≈ 8-16 μm) on a slider (connected to a microactuator) and one on a sensestructure (fixed) with gap-distance of ~ 1 μm. A relative displacement between the two results in a periodic change in capacitance. In normal operation (i.e. the Incremental Capacitance Measurement Mode (ICMM)) the change in capacitance vs. slider displacement is measured directly using a charge amplifier and synchronous detection at 1 MHz. Adjusting the minimal gap-distance by additional sense-actuators increases the capacitance and the S-N Ratio. In a second mode of operation, Constant Capacitance Measurement Mode (CCMM), the gap between sense-structures and slider is actively controlled to keep the sensor-capacitance at a pre-set value for all positions of the slider. Thus, the control signal (i.e. the voltage for the sense-actuator) becomes a measure for the position of the slider. Our results indicate that the position measurement accuracy is increased to ~10 nm in CCM operation compared to 46 nm in normal operation [3]. Further results (using normal operation) show that the realized capacitive sensor can be used in ICMM for frequencies above the resonance frequency (fres~1.6KHz) of the device and therefore also characterizes the important dynamic properties of the test-vehicle.

AB - Integrated high accuracy long-range position sensing will be of paramount importance for high potential applications like future probe memories [1, 2] and probemicroscopy scanners provided that nm position accuracy can be obtained over 10’s of μm displacement range. In this work design, fabrication and measurements of an integrated incremental capacitive long-range position sensor for microactuators are presented. The sensor consists of two periodic geometries (period ≈ 8-16 μm) on a slider (connected to a microactuator) and one on a sensestructure (fixed) with gap-distance of ~ 1 μm. A relative displacement between the two results in a periodic change in capacitance. In normal operation (i.e. the Incremental Capacitance Measurement Mode (ICMM)) the change in capacitance vs. slider displacement is measured directly using a charge amplifier and synchronous detection at 1 MHz. Adjusting the minimal gap-distance by additional sense-actuators increases the capacitance and the S-N Ratio. In a second mode of operation, Constant Capacitance Measurement Mode (CCMM), the gap between sense-structures and slider is actively controlled to keep the sensor-capacitance at a pre-set value for all positions of the slider. Thus, the control signal (i.e. the voltage for the sense-actuator) becomes a measure for the position of the slider. Our results indicate that the position measurement accuracy is increased to ~10 nm in CCM operation compared to 46 nm in normal operation [3]. Further results (using normal operation) show that the realized capacitive sensor can be used in ICMM for frequencies above the resonance frequency (fres~1.6KHz) of the device and therefore also characterizes the important dynamic properties of the test-vehicle.

KW - nano positioning

KW - micromachined capacitive position sensor

KW - synchronous detection

KW - periodic geometries

KW - IR-59586

M3 - Paper

SP - 760

EP - 763

ER -

Kuijpers AA, Krijnen GJM, Wiegerink RJ, Lammerink TSJ, Elwenspoek MC. Measurements for a capacitive incremental position sensor for microactuators. 2004. Paper presented at Annual Workshop on Semiconductor Advances for Future Electronics, SAFE 2004, Veldhoven, Netherlands.