Melt spinning and fibre winding of Trimethylenecarbonate (TMC)-based polymers for tissue engineering small diameter blood vessels

L. Buttafoco*, Niels P. Boks, A. A. Poot, P. J. Dijkstra, I. Vermes, J. Feijen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The use of melt spinning and fiber winding of trimethylenecarbonate (TMC)-based polymers for tissue engineering small diameter blood vessels was investigated in order to overcome the problems and poor performance of artificial blood vessels. For the study, porous tubular scaffolds were obtained by heating PTMC to a temperature of 220°C. It was found that it is possible to produce tubular TMC-based scaffolds by means of melt spinning. It was also found that combining the synthetic scaffold with collagen further enhances the structural integrity in time permitting to obtain a scaffold that resembles the mechanical properties of native blood vessels.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication7th World Biomaterials Congress 2004
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of a meeting held 17-21 May 2004, Sydney, Australia
PublisherCurran Associates Inc.
Number of pages1
ISBN (Print)978-1-60423-461-9
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2004
Event7th World Biomaterials Congress, WBC 2004 - Sydney, Australia
Duration: 17 May 200421 May 2004
Conference number: 7

Conference

Conference7th World Biomaterials Congress, WBC 2004
Abbreviated titleWBC
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period17/05/0421/05/04

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