Modeling the Phase Correlation of Effective Diffuse Scattering from Surfaces for Radio Propagation Prediction with Antennas at Refined Separation

Yang Miao*, Quentin Gueuning, Claude Oestges

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Diffuse scattering (DS), mostly caused by macroscopically rough surfaces, can be modeled by an effective roughness (ER) approach. In the ER approach, the object surface is divided into tiles, and the DS field amplitude associated with each tile is given. Assuming that the transmit antenna (or emitted field) is fixed and the phases associated with different tiles are independent, this paper proposes a phase evolution model based on the relative spatial locations of the receive antenna (Rx) to each tile. The proposed model contains two parts: the deterministic part that depends on the variation of the distance from Rx to tile center, and the correlated random part that depends on the variation of the angle between the Rx and the normal vector of tile. The correlation of the tile field phases resulting from the angular variation is modeled by the exponentially damped cosine correlation function. The proposed phase evolution model is evaluated by being applied to the ER approach to predict the DS component of radio channel transfer function (CTF). The predicted DS-CTF is compared with the reference (simulated data by physical optics and measured data in well-controlled environment) in terms of the spatial autocorrelation as well as the spatial Doppler spectrum.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1427 - 1435
JournalIEEE transactions on antennas and propagation
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Angular and distance variations
  • Diffuse scattering correlation
  • Effective Roughness
  • Measurement
  • Phase evolution
  • Physical optics

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