Modelling of the dynamic interaction between a reacting spray and an acoustic field in a turbulent combustor

V. Fratalocchi, Jacobus B.W. Kok

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Abstract

The work presented in this paper is a first attempt at tracing both the vaporization droplet his-tory and the momentum exchange between the liquid and gas phase, in a reacting flow field exposed to acoustic propagation waves. The liquid phase is tracked with a Lagrangian ap-proach, while the carrier gas phase is modelled in an Eulerian framework, based in a two-way coupling interaction, under the main assumptions of dilute regime and infinite thermal con-ductivity. Acoustic propagating waves will eventually affect the combustion dynamic due to oscillating heat released by the flame. Aim of this work is to assess a strategy to estimate the effect of an oscillating gas velocity field on: droplet displacement, redistribution of the char-acteristic droplet diameters, changes in the evaporation rate. Assuming the hypothesis of di-lute regime as valid, the study is carried out by means of a non-dimensional number charac-terization.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 21st International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 21
EditorsMalcolm J. Crocker
Place of PublicationBeijing, China
PublisherInternational Institute of Acoustics and Vibration (IIAV)
Pages1-8
ISBN (Print)9781634392389
Publication statusPublished - 13 Jul 2014
Event21st International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2014 - Beijing, China
Duration: 13 Jul 201417 Jul 2014
Conference number: 21

Publication series

Name
PublisherInternational Institue of Acoustics and Vibration (IIAV)

Conference

Conference21st International Congress on Sound and Vibration, ICSV 2014
Abbreviated titleICSV
Country/TerritoryChina
CityBeijing
Period13/07/1417/07/14

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