Modifying Consent Procedures to Collect Better Data: The Case of Stress-Monitoring Wearables in the Workplace

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Abstract

Smart wearables can be used in the workplace for organisations to monitor and decrease the stress levels of their employees so they can work better. Such technologies record personal data, which employees might not want to share. The GDPR makes it compulsory to get employees’ consent in such a scenario, but is seen as asking a yes/no question. We show that implementing this consent procedure is not enough to protect employees and make them adopt devices. Based on interviews, we argue that more control must be given to employees on which data is collected and why through an ongoing engagement and consent procedure. It could lead to higher technology adoption rates and data quality
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBusiness Information Systems
Subtitle of host publication22nd International Conference, BIS 2019, Seville, Spain, June 26–28, 2019, Proceedings, Part I
EditorsWitold Abramowicz, Rafael Corchuelo
PublisherSpringer
Pages350-360
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-20485-3
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-20484-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2019
Event22nd International Conference on Business Information Systems 2019 - University of Seville, Seville, Spain
Duration: 26 Jun 201928 Jun 2019
Conference number: 22
http://bis.ue.poznan.pl/bis2019/

Publication series

NameLecture notes in business information processing
Volume353

Conference

Conference22nd International Conference on Business Information Systems 2019
Abbreviated titleBIS 2019
CountrySpain
CitySeville
Period26/06/1928/06/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Monitoring
Work place
Consent
Employees
Scenarios
Technology adoption
Data quality
High technology
Personal data

Cite this

Gauttier, S. E. J. (2019). Modifying Consent Procedures to Collect Better Data: The Case of Stress-Monitoring Wearables in the Workplace. In W. Abramowicz, & R. Corchuelo (Eds.), Business Information Systems: 22nd International Conference, BIS 2019, Seville, Spain, June 26–28, 2019, Proceedings, Part I (pp. 350-360). (Lecture notes in business information processing; Vol. 353). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20485-3_27
Gauttier, Stéphanie E.J. / Modifying Consent Procedures to Collect Better Data: The Case of Stress-Monitoring Wearables in the Workplace. Business Information Systems: 22nd International Conference, BIS 2019, Seville, Spain, June 26–28, 2019, Proceedings, Part I. editor / Witold Abramowicz ; Rafael Corchuelo. Springer, 2019. pp. 350-360 (Lecture notes in business information processing).
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abstract = "Smart wearables can be used in the workplace for organisations to monitor and decrease the stress levels of their employees so they can work better. Such technologies record personal data, which employees might not want to share. The GDPR makes it compulsory to get employees’ consent in such a scenario, but is seen as asking a yes/no question. We show that implementing this consent procedure is not enough to protect employees and make them adopt devices. Based on interviews, we argue that more control must be given to employees on which data is collected and why through an ongoing engagement and consent procedure. It could lead to higher technology adoption rates and data quality",
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Gauttier, SEJ 2019, Modifying Consent Procedures to Collect Better Data: The Case of Stress-Monitoring Wearables in the Workplace. in W Abramowicz & R Corchuelo (eds), Business Information Systems: 22nd International Conference, BIS 2019, Seville, Spain, June 26–28, 2019, Proceedings, Part I. Lecture notes in business information processing, vol. 353, Springer, pp. 350-360, 22nd International Conference on Business Information Systems 2019, Seville, Spain, 26/06/19. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20485-3_27

Modifying Consent Procedures to Collect Better Data: The Case of Stress-Monitoring Wearables in the Workplace. / Gauttier, Stéphanie E.J.

Business Information Systems: 22nd International Conference, BIS 2019, Seville, Spain, June 26–28, 2019, Proceedings, Part I. ed. / Witold Abramowicz; Rafael Corchuelo. Springer, 2019. p. 350-360 (Lecture notes in business information processing; Vol. 353).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

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AB - Smart wearables can be used in the workplace for organisations to monitor and decrease the stress levels of their employees so they can work better. Such technologies record personal data, which employees might not want to share. The GDPR makes it compulsory to get employees’ consent in such a scenario, but is seen as asking a yes/no question. We show that implementing this consent procedure is not enough to protect employees and make them adopt devices. Based on interviews, we argue that more control must be given to employees on which data is collected and why through an ongoing engagement and consent procedure. It could lead to higher technology adoption rates and data quality

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Gauttier SEJ. Modifying Consent Procedures to Collect Better Data: The Case of Stress-Monitoring Wearables in the Workplace. In Abramowicz W, Corchuelo R, editors, Business Information Systems: 22nd International Conference, BIS 2019, Seville, Spain, June 26–28, 2019, Proceedings, Part I. Springer. 2019. p. 350-360. (Lecture notes in business information processing). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20485-3_27