More than Moore creates opportunities for Materials Science

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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    Abstract

    The semiconductor industry is changing focus towards “More than Moore��? innovation. By this is meant that microchip progress may not (or not only) follow from Moore’s Law and its resulting dimensional scaling, but can also come from the addition of new components, new layers and new functions inside the microchip itself. Examples are the introduction of passive RF components, biosensors, radiation detectors and 3-D integration. This new innovation paradigm offers great opportunities for materials scientists. While previously the IC industry was very reluctant to introduce new materials into the manufacturing line, this is now changing. Also, a traditional silicon wafer containing microchips, from a normal fabrication line, can be post-processed in another laboratory to receive further layers, adding functions to the underlying chips. In this presentation we will highlight exemplary new microdevices to illustrate this changing perspective. Each of these devices has its own materials science challenges, both in mastering the material properties, and in the characterization.
    Original languageUndefined
    Pages19-19
    Number of pages1
    Publication statusPublished - 25 Oct 2007

    Keywords

    • IR-62137
    • EWI-11796

    Cite this

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    title = "More than Moore creates opportunities for Materials Science",
    abstract = "The semiconductor industry is changing focus towards “More than Moore��? innovation. By this is meant that microchip progress may not (or not only) follow from Moore’s Law and its resulting dimensional scaling, but can also come from the addition of new components, new layers and new functions inside the microchip itself. Examples are the introduction of passive RF components, biosensors, radiation detectors and 3-D integration. This new innovation paradigm offers great opportunities for materials scientists. While previously the IC industry was very reluctant to introduce new materials into the manufacturing line, this is now changing. Also, a traditional silicon wafer containing microchips, from a normal fabrication line, can be post-processed in another laboratory to receive further layers, adding functions to the underlying chips. In this presentation we will highlight exemplary new microdevices to illustrate this changing perspective. Each of these devices has its own materials science challenges, both in mastering the material properties, and in the characterization.",
    keywords = "IR-62137, EWI-11796",
    author = "Jurriaan Schmitz",
    year = "2007",
    month = "10",
    day = "25",
    language = "Undefined",
    pages = "19--19",

    }

    More than Moore creates opportunities for Materials Science. / Schmitz, Jurriaan.

    2007. 19-19.

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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    AB - The semiconductor industry is changing focus towards “More than Moore��? innovation. By this is meant that microchip progress may not (or not only) follow from Moore’s Law and its resulting dimensional scaling, but can also come from the addition of new components, new layers and new functions inside the microchip itself. Examples are the introduction of passive RF components, biosensors, radiation detectors and 3-D integration. This new innovation paradigm offers great opportunities for materials scientists. While previously the IC industry was very reluctant to introduce new materials into the manufacturing line, this is now changing. Also, a traditional silicon wafer containing microchips, from a normal fabrication line, can be post-processed in another laboratory to receive further layers, adding functions to the underlying chips. In this presentation we will highlight exemplary new microdevices to illustrate this changing perspective. Each of these devices has its own materials science challenges, both in mastering the material properties, and in the characterization.

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