Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces

C. Mühl, Egon van den Broek, Anne-Marie Brouwer, Femke Nijboer, Nelleke van Wouwe, Dirk K.J. Heylen

  • 6 Citations

Abstract

Reliable applications of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI) in realistic, multi-modal environments require a detailed understanding of the processes involved in emotions. To explore the modality-specific nature of affective responses, we studied neurophysiological responses (i.e., EEG) of 24 participants during visual, auditory, and audiovisual affect stimulation. The affect induction protocols were validated by participants’ subjective ratings and physiological responses (i.e., ECG). Coherent with literature, we found modality-specific responses in the EEG: posterior alpha power decreases during visual stimulation and increases during auditory stimulation, anterior alpha power tends to decrease during auditory stimulation and to increase during visual stimulation. We discuss the implications of these results for multi-modal aBCI.
Original languageUndefined
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2011), Part I
EditorsSidney D’Mello, Arthur Graesser, Björn Schuller, Jean-Claude Martin
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages235-245
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-24599-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 Oct 2011
Event4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ASCII 2011 - Memphis, United States

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Volume6974
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ASCII 2011
Abbreviated titleASCII
CountryUnited States
CityMemphis
Period9/10/1112/10/11

Fingerprint

Brain-Computer Interfaces
Acoustic Stimulation
Photic Stimulation
Electroencephalography
Power (Psychology)
Electrocardiography
Emotions

Keywords

  • METIS-281551
  • Auditory
  • Affective brain-computer interfaces
  • BCI
  • IR-78513
  • ECG
  • HMI-CI: Computational Intelligence
  • Visual
  • Emotion
  • Multimodal
  • EWI-20762
  • HMI-MI: MULTIMODAL INTERACTIONS
  • HMI-HF: Human Factors
  • EEG

Cite this

Mühl, C., van den Broek, E., Brouwer, A-M., Nijboer, F., van Wouwe, N., & Heylen, D. K. J. (2011). Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces. In S. D’Mello, A. Graesser, B. Schuller, & J-C. Martin (Eds.), Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2011), Part I (pp. 235-245). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6974). New York: Springer Verlag. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-24600-5_27

Mühl, C.; van den Broek, Egon; Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Nijboer, Femke; van Wouwe, Nelleke; Heylen, Dirk K.J. / Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces.

Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2011), Part I. ed. / Sidney D’Mello; Arthur Graesser; Björn Schuller; Jean-Claude Martin. New York : Springer Verlag, 2011. p. 235-245 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6974).

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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Mühl, C, van den Broek, E, Brouwer, A-M, Nijboer, F, van Wouwe, N & Heylen, DKJ 2011, Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces. in S D’Mello, A Graesser, B Schuller & J-C Martin (eds), Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2011), Part I. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol. 6974, Springer Verlag, New York, pp. 235-245, 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, ASCII 2011, Memphis, United States, 9-12 October. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-24600-5_27

Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces. / Mühl, C.; van den Broek, Egon; Brouwer, Anne-Marie; Nijboer, Femke; van Wouwe, Nelleke; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2011), Part I. ed. / Sidney D’Mello; Arthur Graesser; Björn Schuller; Jean-Claude Martin. New York : Springer Verlag, 2011. p. 235-245 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science; Vol. 6974).

Research output: Scientific - peer-reviewConference contribution

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Mühl C, van den Broek E, Brouwer A-M, Nijboer F, van Wouwe N, Heylen DKJ. Multi-modal affect induction for affective brain-computer interfaces. In D’Mello S, Graesser A, Schuller B, Martin J-C, editors, Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction (ACII 2011), Part I. New York: Springer Verlag. 2011. p. 235-245. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). Available from, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-24600-5_27