Multi-segmented Adaptive Feet for Versatile Legged Locomotion in Natural Terrain

A. Chatterjee, A. Mo, B. Kiss, E.C. Gönen, A. Badri-Spröwitz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Most legged robots are built with leg structures from serially mounted links and actuators and are controlled through complex controllers and sensor feedback. In comparison, animals developed multi-segment legs, mechanical coupling between joints, and multi-segmented feet. They run agile over all terrains, arguably with simpler locomotion control. Here we focus on developing foot mechanisms that resist slipping and sinking also in natural terrain. We present first results of multi-segment feet mounted to a bird-inspired robot leg with multi-joint mechanical tendon coupling. Our one- and two-segment, mechanically adaptive feet show increased viable horizontal forces on multiple soft and hard substrates before starting to slip. We also observe that segmented feet reduce sinking on soft substrates compared to ball-feet and cylinder-feet. We report how multi-segmented feet provide a large range of viable centre of pressure points well suited for bipedal robots, but also for quadruped robots on slopes and natural terrain. Our results also offer a functional understanding of segmented feet in animals like ratite birds.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2023 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), London, United Kingdom
PublisherIEEE
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2023
Externally publishedYes
Event2023 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2023) - London, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 31 May 20232 Jun 2023
https://www.icra2023.org/

Other

Other2023 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2023)
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period31/05/232/06/23
Internet address

Keywords

  • n/a OA procedure

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