Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models: In human and swine, in-vivo, and post mortem

Gerrit C. Langhout, Torre M. Bydlon, M. van der Voort, M. Müller, J. Kortsmit, G. Lucassen, A.J.R. Balthasar, Geert-Jan van Geffen, T. Steinfeldt, H.J.C.M. Sterenborg, B.H.W. Hendriks, Theo J.M. Ruers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Objective
Identification of peripheral nerve tissue is crucial in both surgery and regional anesthesia. Recently, optical tissue identification methods are presented to facilitate nerve identification in transcutaneous procedures and surgery. Optimization and validation of such techniques require large datasets. The use of alternative models to human in vivo, like human post mortem, or swine may be suitable to test, optimize and validate new optical techniques. However, differences in tissue characteristics and thus optical properties, like oxygen saturation and tissue perfusion are to be expected. This requires a structured comparison between the models.

Study Design
Comparative observational study.

Methods
Nerve and surrounding tissues in human (in vivo and post mortem) and swine (in vivo and post mortem) were structurally compared macroscopically, histologically, and spectroscopically. Diffuse reflective spectra were acquired (400–1,600 nm) after illumination with a broad band halogen light. An analytical model was used to quantify optical parameters including concentrations of optical absorbers.

Results
Several differences were found histologically and in the optical parameters. Histologically nerve and adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat and sliding fat) showed clear similarities between human and swine while human muscle enclosed more adipocytes and endomysial collagen. Optical parameters revealed model dependent differences in concentrations of β-carotene, water, fat, and oxygen saturation. The similarity between optical parameters is, however, sufficient to yield a strong positive correlation after cross model classification.

Conclusion
This study shows and discusses similarities and differences in nerve and surrounding tissues between human in vivo and post mortem, and swine in vivo and post mortem; this could support the discussion to use an alternative model to optimize and validate optical techniques for clinical nerve identification. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
LanguageEnglish
Pages253-261
JournalLasers in surgery and medicine
Volume50
Issue number3
Early online date21 Nov 2017
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Nerve Tissue
Spectrum Analysis
Swine
Fats
Oxygen
Halogens
Conduction Anesthesia
Subcutaneous Fat
beta Carotene
Lighting
Peripheral Nerves
Adipocytes
Observational Studies
Adipose Tissue
Lasers
Collagen
Perfusion
Light
Muscles
Water

Cite this

Langhout, Gerrit C. ; Bydlon, Torre M. ; van der Voort, M. ; Müller, M. ; Kortsmit, J. ; Lucassen, G. ; Balthasar, A.J.R. ; van Geffen, Geert-Jan ; Steinfeldt, T. ; Sterenborg, H.J.C.M. ; Hendriks, B.H.W. ; Ruers, Theo J.M./ Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models : In human and swine, in-vivo, and post mortem. In: Lasers in surgery and medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 50, No. 3. pp. 253-261
@article{608ca255ac6e4e56b619eeea4d633bab,
title = "Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models: In human and swine, in-vivo, and post mortem",
abstract = "ObjectiveIdentification of peripheral nerve tissue is crucial in both surgery and regional anesthesia. Recently, optical tissue identification methods are presented to facilitate nerve identification in transcutaneous procedures and surgery. Optimization and validation of such techniques require large datasets. The use of alternative models to human in vivo, like human post mortem, or swine may be suitable to test, optimize and validate new optical techniques. However, differences in tissue characteristics and thus optical properties, like oxygen saturation and tissue perfusion are to be expected. This requires a structured comparison between the models.Study DesignComparative observational study.MethodsNerve and surrounding tissues in human (in vivo and post mortem) and swine (in vivo and post mortem) were structurally compared macroscopically, histologically, and spectroscopically. Diffuse reflective spectra were acquired (400–1,600 nm) after illumination with a broad band halogen light. An analytical model was used to quantify optical parameters including concentrations of optical absorbers.ResultsSeveral differences were found histologically and in the optical parameters. Histologically nerve and adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat and sliding fat) showed clear similarities between human and swine while human muscle enclosed more adipocytes and endomysial collagen. Optical parameters revealed model dependent differences in concentrations of β-carotene, water, fat, and oxygen saturation. The similarity between optical parameters is, however, sufficient to yield a strong positive correlation after cross model classification.ConclusionThis study shows and discusses similarities and differences in nerve and surrounding tissues between human in vivo and post mortem, and swine in vivo and post mortem; this could support the discussion to use an alternative model to optimize and validate optical techniques for clinical nerve identification. Lasers Surg. Med. {\circledC} 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
author = "Langhout, {Gerrit C.} and Bydlon, {Torre M.} and {van der Voort}, M. and M. M{\"u}ller and J. Kortsmit and G. Lucassen and A.J.R. Balthasar and {van Geffen}, Geert-Jan and T. Steinfeldt and H.J.C.M. Sterenborg and B.H.W. Hendriks and Ruers, {Theo J.M.}",
note = "Special Issue: Biomedical Optical Imaging",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1002/lsm.22755",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "253--261",
journal = "Lasers in surgery and medicine",
issn = "0196-8092",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "3",

}

Langhout, GC, Bydlon, TM, van der Voort, M, Müller, M, Kortsmit, J, Lucassen, G, Balthasar, AJR, van Geffen, G-J, Steinfeldt, T, Sterenborg, HJCM, Hendriks, BHW & Ruers, TJM 2018, 'Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models: In human and swine, in-vivo, and post mortem' Lasers in surgery and medicine, vol 50, no. 3, pp. 253-261. DOI: 10.1002/lsm.22755

Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models : In human and swine, in-vivo, and post mortem. / Langhout, Gerrit C.; Bydlon, Torre M.; van der Voort, M.; Müller, M.; Kortsmit, J.; Lucassen, G.; Balthasar, A.J.R.; van Geffen, Geert-Jan; Steinfeldt, T.; Sterenborg, H.J.C.M.; Hendriks, B.H.W.; Ruers, Theo J.M.

In: Lasers in surgery and medicine, Vol. 50, No. 3, 03.2018, p. 253-261.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models

T2 - Lasers in surgery and medicine

AU - Langhout,Gerrit C.

AU - Bydlon,Torre M.

AU - van der Voort,M.

AU - Müller,M.

AU - Kortsmit,J.

AU - Lucassen,G.

AU - Balthasar,A.J.R.

AU - van Geffen,Geert-Jan

AU - Steinfeldt,T.

AU - Sterenborg,H.J.C.M.

AU - Hendriks,B.H.W.

AU - Ruers,Theo J.M.

N1 - Special Issue: Biomedical Optical Imaging

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - ObjectiveIdentification of peripheral nerve tissue is crucial in both surgery and regional anesthesia. Recently, optical tissue identification methods are presented to facilitate nerve identification in transcutaneous procedures and surgery. Optimization and validation of such techniques require large datasets. The use of alternative models to human in vivo, like human post mortem, or swine may be suitable to test, optimize and validate new optical techniques. However, differences in tissue characteristics and thus optical properties, like oxygen saturation and tissue perfusion are to be expected. This requires a structured comparison between the models.Study DesignComparative observational study.MethodsNerve and surrounding tissues in human (in vivo and post mortem) and swine (in vivo and post mortem) were structurally compared macroscopically, histologically, and spectroscopically. Diffuse reflective spectra were acquired (400–1,600 nm) after illumination with a broad band halogen light. An analytical model was used to quantify optical parameters including concentrations of optical absorbers.ResultsSeveral differences were found histologically and in the optical parameters. Histologically nerve and adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat and sliding fat) showed clear similarities between human and swine while human muscle enclosed more adipocytes and endomysial collagen. Optical parameters revealed model dependent differences in concentrations of β-carotene, water, fat, and oxygen saturation. The similarity between optical parameters is, however, sufficient to yield a strong positive correlation after cross model classification.ConclusionThis study shows and discusses similarities and differences in nerve and surrounding tissues between human in vivo and post mortem, and swine in vivo and post mortem; this could support the discussion to use an alternative model to optimize and validate optical techniques for clinical nerve identification. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

AB - ObjectiveIdentification of peripheral nerve tissue is crucial in both surgery and regional anesthesia. Recently, optical tissue identification methods are presented to facilitate nerve identification in transcutaneous procedures and surgery. Optimization and validation of such techniques require large datasets. The use of alternative models to human in vivo, like human post mortem, or swine may be suitable to test, optimize and validate new optical techniques. However, differences in tissue characteristics and thus optical properties, like oxygen saturation and tissue perfusion are to be expected. This requires a structured comparison between the models.Study DesignComparative observational study.MethodsNerve and surrounding tissues in human (in vivo and post mortem) and swine (in vivo and post mortem) were structurally compared macroscopically, histologically, and spectroscopically. Diffuse reflective spectra were acquired (400–1,600 nm) after illumination with a broad band halogen light. An analytical model was used to quantify optical parameters including concentrations of optical absorbers.ResultsSeveral differences were found histologically and in the optical parameters. Histologically nerve and adipose tissue (subcutaneous fat and sliding fat) showed clear similarities between human and swine while human muscle enclosed more adipocytes and endomysial collagen. Optical parameters revealed model dependent differences in concentrations of β-carotene, water, fat, and oxygen saturation. The similarity between optical parameters is, however, sufficient to yield a strong positive correlation after cross model classification.ConclusionThis study shows and discusses similarities and differences in nerve and surrounding tissues between human in vivo and post mortem, and swine in vivo and post mortem; this could support the discussion to use an alternative model to optimize and validate optical techniques for clinical nerve identification. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

U2 - 10.1002/lsm.22755

DO - 10.1002/lsm.22755

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 253

EP - 261

JO - Lasers in surgery and medicine

JF - Lasers in surgery and medicine

SN - 0196-8092

IS - 3

ER -

Langhout GC, Bydlon TM, van der Voort M, Müller M, Kortsmit J, Lucassen G et al. Nerve detection using optical spectroscopy, an evaluation in four different models: In human and swine, in-vivo, and post mortem. Lasers in surgery and medicine. 2018 Mar;50(3):253-261. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/lsm.22755