‘Nonagenarians’ with a hip fracture: is a different orthogeriatric treatment strategy necessary?

R. de Groot, W. S. Nijmeijer*, E. C. Folbert, M. M.R. Vollenbroek-Hutten, J. H. Hegeman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Summary: Nonagenarians differ from patients aged 70–79 and 80–89 years in baseline characteristics, complication and mortality rates. Differences increased gradually with age. The results of this study can be used, in combination with the Almelo Hip Fracture Score, to deliver efficiently targeted orthogeriatric treatment to the right patient group. Purpose: In previous literature, elderly with a hip fracture are frequently defined as ≥ 70 years. However, given the ageing population and the rapidly increasing number of ‘nonagenarians’ (aged ≥ 90 years), the question rises whether this definition is still actual. The aim of this study is to determine whether nonagenarians show differences compared to patients aged 70–79 years and patients aged 80–89 years in terms of patient characteristics, complications and mortality rate. Methods: From April 2008 until December 2016, hip fracture patients aged ≥ 70 years treated according to our orthogeriatric treatment model were included. Patients were divided into three different groups based on age at admission: 70–79 years, 80–89 years and ≥ 90 years. Patient characteristics, risk of early mortality, complications and outcomes were analysed. Risk factors for 30-day mortality in nonagenarians were determined. Results: A total of 1587 patients were included: 465 patients aged 70–80 years, 867 patients aged 80–90 years and 255 patients aged ≥ 90 years. Nonagenarians were more often female and had a lower haemoglobin level at admission. Prefracture, they were more often living in a nursing home, were more dependent in activities of daily living and mobility and had a higher risk of early mortality calculated with the Almelo Hip Fracture Score (AHFS). Post-operative, nonagenarians suffer significantly more often from delirium and anaemia. The 30-day mortality and 1-year mortality were significantly higher. Differences increased gradually with age. Conclusion: Nonagenarians differ from patients aged 70–79 and 80–89 years in baseline characteristics, complication and mortality rates. Differences increased gradually with age. The results of this study can be used, in combination with the Almelo Hip Fracture Score, to deliver efficiently targeted orthogeriatric treatment to the right patient group.

Original languageEnglish
Article number19
JournalArchives of Osteoporosis
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • Frail elderly
  • Hip fracture
  • Nonagenarians
  • Orthogeriatric
  • Surgery

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