Nuclear medicine in the assessment and prevention of cancer therapy-related cardiotoxicity: prospects and proposal of use by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

Matthias Totzeck, Nicolas Aide, Johann Bauersachs, Jan Bucerius, Panagiotis Georgoulias, Ken Herrmann, Fabien Hyafil, Jolanta Kunikowska, Mark Lubberink, Carmela Nappi, Tienush Rassaf, Antti Saraste, Roberto Sciagra, Riemer H.J.A. Slart, Hein Verberne, Christoph Rischpler*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Abstract: Cardiotoxicity may present as (pulmonary) hypertension, acute and chronic coronary syndromes, venous thromboembolism, cardiomyopathies/heart failure, arrhythmia, valvular heart disease, peripheral arterial disease, and myocarditis. Many of these disease entities can be diagnosed by established cardiovascular diagnostic pathways. Nuclear medicine, however, has proven promising in the diagnosis of cardiomyopathies/heart failure, and peri- and myocarditis as well as arterial inflammation. This article first outlines the spectrum of cardiotoxic cancer therapies and the potential side effects. This will be complemented by the definition of cardiotoxicity using non-nuclear cardiovascular imaging (echocardiography, CMR) and biomarkers. Available nuclear imaging techniques are then presented and specific suggestions are made for their application and potential role in the diagnosis of cardiotoxicity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)792-812
JournalEuropean journal of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging
Volume50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2023

Keywords

  • Cancer therapy-related cardiotoxicity
  • Cardio-oncology
  • Chemotherapy
  • Immunotherapy
  • Nuclear medicine
  • PET
  • Radiotherapy
  • SPECT

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