Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve: Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root

F. De Vita, M.D. De Tullio, R. Verzicco*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This work focuses on the comparison between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flows through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in the aortic root. The blood, in fact, is a concentrated suspension of cells, mainly red blood cells, in a Newtonian matrix, the plasma, and consequently its overall behavior is that of a non-Newtonian fluid owing to the action of the cells’ membrane on the fluid part. The common practice, however, assumes the blood in large vessels as a Newtonian fluid since the shear rate is generally high and the effective viscosity becomes independent of the former. In this paper, we show that this is not always the case even in the aorta, the largest artery of the systemic circulation, owing to the pulsatile and transitional nature of the flow. Unexpectedly, for most of the pulsating cycle and in a large part of the fluid volume, the shear rate is smaller than the threshold level for the blood to display a constant effective viscosity and its shear thinning character might affect the system dynamics. A direct inspection of the various flow features has shown that the valve dynamics, the transvalvular pressure drop and the large-scale features of the flow are very similar for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models. On the other hand, the mechanical damage of the red blood cells (hemolysis), induced by the altered stress values in the flow, is larger for the non-Newtonian fluid model than for the Newtonian one.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-138
Number of pages10
JournalTheoretical and computational fluid dynamics
Volume30
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2016

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blood flow
Blood
Fluids
fluids
Computer simulation
blood
Newtonian fluids
erythrocytes
simulation
Shear deformation
heart valves
viscosity
hemolysis
shear
aorta
Cells
shear thinning
Viscosity
arteries
pressure drop

Keywords

  • Hemolysis
  • Mechanical aortic valve
  • Non-Newtonian fluid

Cite this

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title = "Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve: Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root",
abstract = "This work focuses on the comparison between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flows through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve in the aortic root. The blood, in fact, is a concentrated suspension of cells, mainly red blood cells, in a Newtonian matrix, the plasma, and consequently its overall behavior is that of a non-Newtonian fluid owing to the action of the cells’ membrane on the fluid part. The common practice, however, assumes the blood in large vessels as a Newtonian fluid since the shear rate is generally high and the effective viscosity becomes independent of the former. In this paper, we show that this is not always the case even in the aorta, the largest artery of the systemic circulation, owing to the pulsatile and transitional nature of the flow. Unexpectedly, for most of the pulsating cycle and in a large part of the fluid volume, the shear rate is smaller than the threshold level for the blood to display a constant effective viscosity and its shear thinning character might affect the system dynamics. A direct inspection of the various flow features has shown that the valve dynamics, the transvalvular pressure drop and the large-scale features of the flow are very similar for the Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models. On the other hand, the mechanical damage of the red blood cells (hemolysis), induced by the altered stress values in the flow, is larger for the non-Newtonian fluid model than for the Newtonian one.",
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Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian blood flow through a mechanical aortic valve : Non-Newtonian blood flow in the aortic root. / De Vita, F.; De Tullio, M.D.; Verzicco, R.

In: Theoretical and computational fluid dynamics, Vol. 30, No. 1-2, 01.04.2016, p. 129-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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