Opportunities for protecting and restoring tropical coastal ecosystems by utilizing a physical connectivity approach

Lucy G. Gillis* (Corresponding Author), Clive G. Jones, Alan D. Ziegler, Daphne van der Wal, Annette Breckwoldt, Tjeerd J. Bouma

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effectively managing human pressures on tropical seascapes (mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and coral reefs) requires innovative approaches that go beyond the ecosystem as the focal unit. Recent advances in scientific understanding of long-distance connectivity via extended ecosystem engineering effects and on-going rapid developments in monitoring and data-sharing technologies provide viable tools for novel management approaches that use positive across-ecosystem interactions (for example, hydrodynamics). Scientists and managers can now use this collective knowledge to develop monitoring and restoration protocols that are specialized for cross ecosystem fluxes (waves, sediments, nutrients) on a site-specific basis for connected tropical seascape (mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and coral reefs).

Original languageEnglish
Article number374
JournalFrontiers in Marine Science
Volume4
Issue numberNOV
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Nov 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coral reefs
  • Ecosystem engineers
  • Facilitation
  • Mangrove forests
  • Monitoring
  • Seagrass beds
  • ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE
  • ITC-GOLD

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Opportunities for protecting and restoring tropical coastal ecosystems by utilizing a physical connectivity approach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this