Optoelectrical cooling of polar molecules

M. Zeppenfeld, M. Motsch, P. W H Pinkse, G. Rempe

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Abstract

We present an optoelectrical cooling scheme for polar molecules based on a Sisyphus-type cooling cycle in suitably tailored electric trapping fields. Dissipation is provided by spontaneous vibrational decay in a closed level scheme found in symmetric-top rotors comprising six low-field-seeking rovibrational states. A generic trap design is presented. Suitable molecules are identified with vibrational decay rates on the order of 100 Hz. A simulation of the cooling process shows that the molecular temperature can be reduced from 1 K to 1 mK in approximately 10 s. The molecules remain electrically trapped during this time, indicating that the ultracold regime can be reached in an experimentally feasible scheme.

Original languageEnglish
Article number041401
JournalPhysical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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cooling
molecules
rotors
decay rates
dissipation
trapping
traps
cycles
decay
simulation
temperature

Cite this

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Optoelectrical cooling of polar molecules. / Zeppenfeld, M.; Motsch, M.; Pinkse, P. W H; Rempe, G.

In: Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, Vol. 80, No. 4, 041401, 05.10.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Zeppenfeld, M.

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AU - Pinkse, P. W H

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AB - We present an optoelectrical cooling scheme for polar molecules based on a Sisyphus-type cooling cycle in suitably tailored electric trapping fields. Dissipation is provided by spontaneous vibrational decay in a closed level scheme found in symmetric-top rotors comprising six low-field-seeking rovibrational states. A generic trap design is presented. Suitable molecules are identified with vibrational decay rates on the order of 100 Hz. A simulation of the cooling process shows that the molecular temperature can be reduced from 1 K to 1 mK in approximately 10 s. The molecules remain electrically trapped during this time, indicating that the ultracold regime can be reached in an experimentally feasible scheme.

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