Parental Self-Control and the Development of Male Aggression in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Test of Self-Control Theory

Ryan C. Meldrum (Corresponding Author), Marjolein Verhoeven, Marianne Junger, Marcel A.G. van Aken, Maja Dekovic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of studies have evaluated associations between parenting practices, adolescent self-control, and adolescent antisocial behavior. Yet, few studies have examined associations between these constructs in early childhood or examined the extent to which both maternal and paternal self-control shapes them. To address these gaps, the current study utilizes longitudinal data collected on a sample of 117 Dutch boys and their parents to investigate the across time interrelationships between parental self-control, ineffective parenting, child self-control, and child aggression. The results provide evidence of an indirect association between maternal self-control and early childhood self-control through maternal ineffective parenting, an indirect association between maternal ineffective parenting and early childhood aggression through early childhood self-control, and an indirect association between maternal self-control and early childhood aggression through both maternal ineffective parenting and early childhood self-control. In contrast, paternal self-control and paternal ineffective parenting were unrelated to child self-control and child aggression. The implications and limitations of the study are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)935-957
Number of pages23
JournalInternational journal of offender therapy and comparative criminology
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

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