PATHWAYS TO COLLABORATIVE IMPLEMENTATION: Problems, decisions, persistence, progress, and consensus in Collaborative Implementation, studied through projects for Integrated Water Resources Management in Colombia

Gustavo Valdivieso Cervera

    Research output: ThesisPhD Thesis - Research UT, graduation UT

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    Abstract

    Collaborative governance is seen not only as an option to improve the outcomes of the combined efforts of various actors but also as a way to give legitimacy to public decision-making. Collaborative decision-making is relevant not only to industrialized countries—from which the approach originated—but also to societies in other parts of the world, such as Latin America. However, there is also concern in science and professional practice about collaborative inertia, the trend of collaborative activities being frustratingly slow to produce outputs or uncomfortably conflict-ridden.
    This dissertation attempts to find interventions that could help prevent collaborative inertia through a better understanding of how collaborative implementation works and which conditions favor or hinder successful collaborative implementation.
    The empirical context of the thesis concerns three pilot projects for the implementation of a new integrated water management policy in Colombia, as well as five specific decisions within them. Within-case variation suggests that the conditions identified in the dissertation are relevant for collaborative implementation beyond specific contexts, although at least one of those conditions, the use of authority, is more likely to show in collaborations within some specific politico-administrative traditions.
    Two conceptual innovations are introduced to help improve our understanding of collaborative implementation. First, a distinction between conditions mainly associated with the creation and persistence of collaborations and those mainly associated with the pace of their progress. Second, the concept of problem compatibility as an alternative to frames, narratives, or other similar constructs to understand both consensus and conflict upon specific decisions.
    The methodological innovations include the combined use of sufficiency, necessity, and configurational analysis to identify what QCA calls INUS conditions -those that are neither sufficient nor necessary, yet still present in configurations. At last one INUS condition identified in the analysis is seen as potentially convenient, under certain circumstances, for collaborative implementation.
    The dissertation finds a special role for problem compatibility and trust in the configurations driving good progress in collaborative implementation, while perceived interdependence remains the main influence driving persistence. The influence of problem compatibility shows the importance of knowledge for collaborative implementation.
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • University of Twente
    • Universidad Externado de Colombia
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Kuhlmann, Stefan, Supervisor
    • Torenvlied, René, Co-Supervisor
    • Ordonez Matamoros, Gonzalo, Supervisor
    Award date8 Mar 2023
    Place of PublicationEnschede, The Netherlands
    Publisher
    Print ISBNs978-90-365-5556-2
    Electronic ISBNs978-90-365-5557-9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2023

    Keywords

    • Collaborative governance
    • Policy implementation
    • Integrated water resources management
    • Colombia
    • Knowledge
    • Frames
    • Problem structure
    • Problem structuring

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