Peritoneal transforming growth factor beta-1 expression during prolonged laparoscopic procedures

Mare M A Lensvelt, Walter J A Brokelman, Marie Louise Ivarsson, Peter Falk, Michel M P J Reijnen (Corresponding Author)

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal physiology. Short-term laparoscopic surgery does not affect peritoneal transforming growth factor beta (TGF-b1) expression. The current study was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that prolonged laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal TGF-b1 expression. Study Design: In the first study, 24 patients scheduled for a right colonic resection were enrolled in the trial. Twelve underwent conventional surgery (CCR) and 12 were operated on laparoscopically (LCR). In the second study, 12 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) surgery for morbid obesity were included. Biopsies of the parietal peritoneum were taken at standardized moments during the procedures. Tissue concentrations of active and total TGF-b1 were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: During the LCR, there was a significant increase in peritoneal active TGF-b1 levels (P<0.05). A similar, but not significant, trend was observed during the CCR. A similar pattern was seen in the total TGF-b1 concentrations during both procedures. The LGB procedure did not affect peritoneal active or total TGF-b1 concentrations. During the procedure, both the active and total TGF-b1 levels were significantly higher in the LCR, when compared to the LGB, group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Prolonged laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal TGF-b1 expression, depending on the procedure performed. Considering the role of TGF-b1 in various biologic processes, including adhesiogenesis and oncology, these results may have clinical consequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)545-550
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Transforming Growth Factor beta
Laparoscopy
Gastric Bypass
Morbid Obesity
Peritoneum
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Biopsy

Cite this

Lensvelt, Mare M A ; Brokelman, Walter J A ; Ivarsson, Marie Louise ; Falk, Peter ; Reijnen, Michel M P J. / Peritoneal transforming growth factor beta-1 expression during prolonged laparoscopic procedures. In: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques. 2010 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 545-550.
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abstract = "Background: Laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal physiology. Short-term laparoscopic surgery does not affect peritoneal transforming growth factor beta (TGF-b1) expression. The current study was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that prolonged laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal TGF-b1 expression. Study Design: In the first study, 24 patients scheduled for a right colonic resection were enrolled in the trial. Twelve underwent conventional surgery (CCR) and 12 were operated on laparoscopically (LCR). In the second study, 12 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) surgery for morbid obesity were included. Biopsies of the parietal peritoneum were taken at standardized moments during the procedures. Tissue concentrations of active and total TGF-b1 were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: During the LCR, there was a significant increase in peritoneal active TGF-b1 levels (P<0.05). A similar, but not significant, trend was observed during the CCR. A similar pattern was seen in the total TGF-b1 concentrations during both procedures. The LGB procedure did not affect peritoneal active or total TGF-b1 concentrations. During the procedure, both the active and total TGF-b1 levels were significantly higher in the LCR, when compared to the LGB, group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Prolonged laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal TGF-b1 expression, depending on the procedure performed. Considering the role of TGF-b1 in various biologic processes, including adhesiogenesis and oncology, these results may have clinical consequences.",
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Peritoneal transforming growth factor beta-1 expression during prolonged laparoscopic procedures. / Lensvelt, Mare M A; Brokelman, Walter J A; Ivarsson, Marie Louise; Falk, Peter; Reijnen, Michel M P J (Corresponding Author).

In: Journal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.07.2010, p. 545-550.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Lensvelt, Mare M A

AU - Brokelman, Walter J A

AU - Ivarsson, Marie Louise

AU - Falk, Peter

AU - Reijnen, Michel M P J

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N2 - Background: Laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal physiology. Short-term laparoscopic surgery does not affect peritoneal transforming growth factor beta (TGF-b1) expression. The current study was conducted to evaluate the hypothesis that prolonged laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal TGF-b1 expression. Study Design: In the first study, 24 patients scheduled for a right colonic resection were enrolled in the trial. Twelve underwent conventional surgery (CCR) and 12 were operated on laparoscopically (LCR). In the second study, 12 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass (LGB) surgery for morbid obesity were included. Biopsies of the parietal peritoneum were taken at standardized moments during the procedures. Tissue concentrations of active and total TGF-b1 were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: During the LCR, there was a significant increase in peritoneal active TGF-b1 levels (P<0.05). A similar, but not significant, trend was observed during the CCR. A similar pattern was seen in the total TGF-b1 concentrations during both procedures. The LGB procedure did not affect peritoneal active or total TGF-b1 concentrations. During the procedure, both the active and total TGF-b1 levels were significantly higher in the LCR, when compared to the LGB, group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Prolonged laparoscopic surgery may affect peritoneal TGF-b1 expression, depending on the procedure performed. Considering the role of TGF-b1 in various biologic processes, including adhesiogenesis and oncology, these results may have clinical consequences.

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