Personal health records success; Why Google Health failed and what does that mean for Microsoft Health Vault?

Antonius A.M. Spil, Rich Klein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Five years of experimenting with Personal Health Records has not yielded the results that big companies like Google and Microsoft expected. Whereas Google pulled the plug on its product offering, Microsoft struggles to reach sufficient critical mass. This study adopts a user perspective (51 interviews) in conjunction with grounded theory, to offer explanations why Google Health failed and predictions relative to Microsoft’s ability to reach a tipping point with respect to product/service viability. Noteworthy, vendors ignore relevance, or perceived usefulness when designing PHRs. Moreover, low trust and high risks do not bode well for long-term success, with the widely used information systems success models often neglecting the latter two critical dimensions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the forty-seventh annual Hawaii international conference on system sciences
EditorsRalph H. Sprague
Place of PublicationWaikoloa, Hawaii
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2818-2827
ISBN (Print)978-1-4799-2504-9
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jan 2014
Event47th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014 - Waikoloa, United States
Duration: 6 Jan 20149 Jan 2014
Conference number: 47

Publication series

Name
PublisherIEEE Computer Society

Conference

Conference47th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2014
Abbreviated titleHICSS
CountryUnited States
CityWaikoloa
Period6/01/149/01/14

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Keywords

  • METIS-305003
  • IR-91732

Cite this

Spil, A. A. M., & Klein, R. (2014). Personal health records success; Why Google Health failed and what does that mean for Microsoft Health Vault? In R. H. Sprague (Ed.), Proceedings of the forty-seventh annual Hawaii international conference on system sciences (pp. 2818-2827). Waikoloa, Hawaii: IEEE Computer Society.