Personalizing medicine and technologies to address the experiences and needs of people with multiple sclerosis

Adam Henschke*, Jane Desborough, Anne Parkinson, Crystal Brunoro, Vanessa Fanning, Christian Lueck, Anne Brüstle, Janet Drew, Katrina Chisholm, Mark Elisha, Hanna Suominen, Nicola Brew-Stam, Antonio Tricoli, Christopher Nolan, Christine Phillips, Matthew Cook

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

There is enormous variation in the manifestations of disease experienced by people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). While this variation makes personalized medicine an attractive goal, there are many challenges to be overcome before this opportunity can be realized. Personalized medicine often focuses on targeted therapies and detailed monitoring, but we also need to recognize that there will be variation in acceptance of these approaches by different PwMS. In other words, deep personalization of medicine will encompass targeted therapy, precision monitoring, tailored to variation in personal attitudes to these transformations in health care. In order to meet the promise of personalized medicine for MS, understanding the experiences of PwMS is necessary both to aid in the uptake of personalized medicine, and to ensure that personalized approaches to monitoring disease and treatment provide a net benefit to PwMS rather than placing additional burdens and stressors on them. Here, we describe recent research that identified five experiential themes for PwMS, and then interpret these themes according to the foundations of personalized medicine to provide a road map for implementation of personalized medicine solutions for PwMS
Original languageEnglish
Article number791
JournalJournal of Personalized Medicine
Volume11
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2021

Keywords

  • UT-Gold-D

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