Photoacoustic imaging of blood perfusion in tissue and phantoms

Magdalena C. Pilatou, Roy G.M. Kolkman, Erwin Hondebrink, René Alexander Bolt, Frits F.M. de Mul

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    To localize and monitor the blood content in tissue we developed a very sensitive photo-acoustical detector. PVDF has been used as piezo-electric material. In this detector also fibers for the illumination of the sample are integrated. Resolution is about 20 (m in depth and about 50-100 m laterally). We use 532 nm light. We will show how photoacoustics can be used for measuring the thickness of tissue above bone. We will also report measurements on tissue phantoms: e.g. a vessel delta from the epigastric artery branching of a Wistar rat, filled with an artificial blood-resembling absorber. The measurements have been carried out on phantoms containing vessels at several depths. Signal processing was enhanced by Fourier processing of the data.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationBiomedical Optoacoustics II (BIOS 2001)
    Subtitle of host publicationInternational Symposium on Biomedical Optics, 20-26 January 2001, San Jose, CA, USA
    EditorsAlexander A. Oraevsky
    PublisherSPIE
    Pages28-33
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)0-8194-3934-7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 20 Jan 2001
    EventSPIE International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, BIOS 2001 - San Jose, United States
    Duration: 20 Jan 200126 Jan 2001

    Publication series

    NameProceedings of SPIE
    PublisherSPIE
    Volume4256

    Conference

    ConferenceSPIE International Symposium on Biomedical Optics, BIOS 2001
    Abbreviated titleBIOS
    Country/TerritoryUnited States
    CitySan Jose
    Period20/01/0126/01/01

    Keywords

    • Photoacoustics
    • Piezoelectric transducers
    • Tissue
    • Blood
    • Imaging

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