Pocket money, eating behaviors, and weight status among Chinese children: The Childhood Obesity Study in China mega-cities

Miao Li, Hong Xue, Peng Jia, Yaling Zhao, Zhiyong Wang, Fei Xu, Youfa Wang*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both the obesity rate and pocket money are rising among children in China. This study examined family correlates of children's pocket money, associations of pocket money with eating behaviors and weight status, and how the associations may be modified by schools' unhealthy food restrictions in urban China. Data were collected in 2015 from 1648 students in 16 primary and middle schools in four mega-cities in China (4 schools/city): Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Xi'an. Cluster robust negative binomial regression models were fit to assess family correlates of pocket money, associations of pocket money with child eating behaviors and weight outcomes, and possible modifying effects of schools' unhealthy food restrictions. Sixty-nine percent of students received pocket money weekly. Students received more pocket money if mothers frequently ate out of home (IRR = 2.28 [1.76, 2.94]) and/or family rarely had dinner together (IRR = 1.42, 95% = [1.01, 1.99]). Students got less pocket money if parents were concerned about child's future health due to unhealthy eating (IRR = 0.56 [0.32,0.98]). Students with more pocket money more frequently consumed (by 25–89%) sugary beverages, snacks, fast food, or at street food stalls, and were 45–90% more likely to be overweight/obese. Associations of pocket money with unhealthy eating and overweight/obesity were weaker in schools with unhealthy food restrictions. Pocket money is a risk factor for unhealthy eating and obesity in urban China. School policies may buffer pocket money's negative influence on students' eating and weight status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-215
Number of pages8
JournalPreventive medicine
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Feeding Behavior
China
Students
Weights and Measures
Eating
Food
Obesity
Fast Foods
Snacks
Beverages
Child Behavior
Statistical Models
Meals
Buffers
Parents
Mothers
insulin receptor-related receptor

Keywords

  • China
  • Eating behavior
  • Obesity
  • Overweight
  • Pocket money
  • School policy
  • ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE

Cite this

Li, Miao ; Xue, Hong ; Jia, Peng ; Zhao, Yaling ; Wang, Zhiyong ; Xu, Fei ; Wang, Youfa. / Pocket money, eating behaviors, and weight status among Chinese children : The Childhood Obesity Study in China mega-cities. In: Preventive medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 100. pp. 208-215.
@article{cb81f0cffb3e4098b51d2c489bd43759,
title = "Pocket money, eating behaviors, and weight status among Chinese children: The Childhood Obesity Study in China mega-cities",
abstract = "Both the obesity rate and pocket money are rising among children in China. This study examined family correlates of children's pocket money, associations of pocket money with eating behaviors and weight status, and how the associations may be modified by schools' unhealthy food restrictions in urban China. Data were collected in 2015 from 1648 students in 16 primary and middle schools in four mega-cities in China (4 schools/city): Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Xi'an. Cluster robust negative binomial regression models were fit to assess family correlates of pocket money, associations of pocket money with child eating behaviors and weight outcomes, and possible modifying effects of schools' unhealthy food restrictions. Sixty-nine percent of students received pocket money weekly. Students received more pocket money if mothers frequently ate out of home (IRR = 2.28 [1.76, 2.94]) and/or family rarely had dinner together (IRR = 1.42, 95{\%} = [1.01, 1.99]). Students got less pocket money if parents were concerned about child's future health due to unhealthy eating (IRR = 0.56 [0.32,0.98]). Students with more pocket money more frequently consumed (by 25–89{\%}) sugary beverages, snacks, fast food, or at street food stalls, and were 45–90{\%} more likely to be overweight/obese. Associations of pocket money with unhealthy eating and overweight/obesity were weaker in schools with unhealthy food restrictions. Pocket money is a risk factor for unhealthy eating and obesity in urban China. School policies may buffer pocket money's negative influence on students' eating and weight status.",
keywords = "China, Eating behavior, Obesity, Overweight, Pocket money, School policy, ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE",
author = "Miao Li and Hong Xue and Peng Jia and Yaling Zhao and Zhiyong Wang and Fei Xu and Youfa Wang",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.031",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "208--215",
journal = "Preventive medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

Pocket money, eating behaviors, and weight status among Chinese children : The Childhood Obesity Study in China mega-cities. / Li, Miao; Xue, Hong; Jia, Peng; Zhao, Yaling; Wang, Zhiyong; Xu, Fei; Wang, Youfa.

In: Preventive medicine, Vol. 100, 01.07.2017, p. 208-215.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pocket money, eating behaviors, and weight status among Chinese children

T2 - The Childhood Obesity Study in China mega-cities

AU - Li, Miao

AU - Xue, Hong

AU - Jia, Peng

AU - Zhao, Yaling

AU - Wang, Zhiyong

AU - Xu, Fei

AU - Wang, Youfa

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Both the obesity rate and pocket money are rising among children in China. This study examined family correlates of children's pocket money, associations of pocket money with eating behaviors and weight status, and how the associations may be modified by schools' unhealthy food restrictions in urban China. Data were collected in 2015 from 1648 students in 16 primary and middle schools in four mega-cities in China (4 schools/city): Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Xi'an. Cluster robust negative binomial regression models were fit to assess family correlates of pocket money, associations of pocket money with child eating behaviors and weight outcomes, and possible modifying effects of schools' unhealthy food restrictions. Sixty-nine percent of students received pocket money weekly. Students received more pocket money if mothers frequently ate out of home (IRR = 2.28 [1.76, 2.94]) and/or family rarely had dinner together (IRR = 1.42, 95% = [1.01, 1.99]). Students got less pocket money if parents were concerned about child's future health due to unhealthy eating (IRR = 0.56 [0.32,0.98]). Students with more pocket money more frequently consumed (by 25–89%) sugary beverages, snacks, fast food, or at street food stalls, and were 45–90% more likely to be overweight/obese. Associations of pocket money with unhealthy eating and overweight/obesity were weaker in schools with unhealthy food restrictions. Pocket money is a risk factor for unhealthy eating and obesity in urban China. School policies may buffer pocket money's negative influence on students' eating and weight status.

AB - Both the obesity rate and pocket money are rising among children in China. This study examined family correlates of children's pocket money, associations of pocket money with eating behaviors and weight status, and how the associations may be modified by schools' unhealthy food restrictions in urban China. Data were collected in 2015 from 1648 students in 16 primary and middle schools in four mega-cities in China (4 schools/city): Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, and Xi'an. Cluster robust negative binomial regression models were fit to assess family correlates of pocket money, associations of pocket money with child eating behaviors and weight outcomes, and possible modifying effects of schools' unhealthy food restrictions. Sixty-nine percent of students received pocket money weekly. Students received more pocket money if mothers frequently ate out of home (IRR = 2.28 [1.76, 2.94]) and/or family rarely had dinner together (IRR = 1.42, 95% = [1.01, 1.99]). Students got less pocket money if parents were concerned about child's future health due to unhealthy eating (IRR = 0.56 [0.32,0.98]). Students with more pocket money more frequently consumed (by 25–89%) sugary beverages, snacks, fast food, or at street food stalls, and were 45–90% more likely to be overweight/obese. Associations of pocket money with unhealthy eating and overweight/obesity were weaker in schools with unhealthy food restrictions. Pocket money is a risk factor for unhealthy eating and obesity in urban China. School policies may buffer pocket money's negative influence on students' eating and weight status.

KW - China

KW - Eating behavior

KW - Obesity

KW - Overweight

KW - Pocket money

KW - School policy

KW - ITC-ISI-JOURNAL-ARTICLE

UR - http://ezproxy2.utwente.nl/login?url=https://webapps.itc.utwente.nl/library/2017/isi/jia_poc.pdf

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.031

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.04.031

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85018342291

VL - 100

SP - 208

EP - 215

JO - Preventive medicine

JF - Preventive medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -